News & Media

13 September, 2019

Australian Newsletter - Issue 591

DO PORTS NEED GLOBAL REGULATION?
Source: Shailaja A. Lakshmi (Maritime Logistics Professional)
Ports are essential for the global supply chain - but do they need more international regulation? High-level speakers engaged in a lively debate at a joint Hutchison Ports, International Maritime Organization (IMO) and IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) seminar (9 September), to address the question: "Do ports need international regulation?" IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reminded the audience that the IMO Convention does give the Organization a mandate to regulate in ports and some current IMO regulations do indeed extend to port operations - for example those surrounding security, reception facilities and the Facilitation (FAL) Convention.  FULL STORY

INVESTIGATION BEGINS INTO HOW CARGO SHIP ENDED ON ITS SIDE
Source: Russ Bynum (Navy Times)
As authorities try to answer why a cargo ship carrying 4,200 vehicles overturned on the Georgia coast, maritime experts say investigators will be looking for shifting cargo or other problems that upset the giant vessel’s balance enough to make it fall onto its side. The U.S. Coast Guard is leading the investigation into what caused the South Korean ship Golden Ray to capsize early Sunday soon after it departed the Port of Brunswick, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) south of Savannah. The ship’s pilot and 23 crew members were all safely rescued, including four men trapped for 36 hours before they could be extracted through a hole drilled into the hull. Measuring 656 feet (199 meters) long and 83 feet (25 meters) wide, the Golden Ray is roughly the size of a 7-story office building. Such vehicle carries tend to be ungainly and bulky, making them “like a floating shoebox,” said Joseph Murphy, a retired ship captain and professor of marine transportation at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.  FULL STORY

TRUCKS, SHIPS MAY FACE LESS IMO 2020 RISK THAN FEARED
Source: Greg Miller (American Shipper)
The disaster scenario for the International Maritime Organization’s 2020 fuel rule (IMO 2020) predicts a surge in fuel prices, not just for ships, but for trucks, trains and airplanes. But there’s a big “if” embedded in this doomsday scenario – that all other factors remain equal. What if they aren’t? What if global distillate demand declines prior to and during the regulation’s implementation phase due to an economic slowdown or headwinds related to trade tensions? What if IMO 2020 incremental demand is created exactly as predicted, but it turns out that it merely offsets non-IMO 2020-related demand losses and we’re just back to where we started? There is increasing evidence that this much more optimistic fuel-price scenario is at least partially possible.  FULL STORY

CHINESE SHIP DETAINED AT BRISBANE PORT
Source: Aaron Bunch (Goulburn Post)
A Chinese-owned ship is being detained at a Queensland port after its crew reported $100,000 in unpaid wages to the transport workers' union. The Hong Kong-flagged bulk carrier MV Xing Jing Hai was delivering materials to the Port of Brisbane when it was detained by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority on Wednesday. "It's the third case of wage theft and exploitation of foreign seafarers transporting goods to and from Australia that has been identified in the past week," International Transport Workers' Federation assistant coordinator Matt Purcell told AAP on Thursday.  FULL STORY and RELATED STORY

PORT OF BRISBANE UNVEILS INLAND RAIL ACCESS REPORT
Source: Rob McKay (Australasian Transport News)
A dedicated freight rail line from Inland Rail to the Port of Brisbane (POB) "could take 2.4 million of trucks off the road by 2035", according to a Deloitte Access Economics (DAE) report for the port operator. Separating the existing shared passenger and freight rail networks to link the Inland Rail project to the Port of Brisbane while allowing for double-stacking of containers is seen as both logical and essential by proponents. But it was not budgeted for and the 2015 Inland Rail business case identified the existing infrastructure as being suitable until 2030. Despite that, a $1.5 million joint federal and Queensland government study was announced in April 2018 and its findings are awaited eagerly by rail, logistics and port interests.  FULL STORY

NORWEGIAN HAS MADE WOLLONGONG AN EMBARKATION PORT
Source: Rose Jacobs (Cruise Passenger)
Wollongong has announced Port Kembla will be an embarkation port in 2021 – and could be an alternative turn-around port for Sydney.
Cruise Wollongong Chair Cr Leigh Colacino broke the news on Thursday morning when he revealed Norwegian Jewel will sail from Port Kembla on January 13, 2021. With much criticism surrounding the capacity issues at the Overseas Passenger Terminal in Sydney Harbour, Destination NSW has been searching for a new cruise strategy for the state, so as to not miss out on the growing cruise market. Brisbane is due to open a new terminal next year, and Melbourne has already snatched Royal Caribbean and Cunard vessels to add to its homeported fleet.  FULL STORY

CALLS TO MANAGE CRUISE SHIP VISITOR GROWTH, WITH SOME TOURISM HOTSPOTS OVERWHELMED
Source: Lucy Shannon (ABC News)
Tourism operators are usually excited about the prospect of a busy summer season ahead — but Rachel Power from Mount Field National Park's visitor centre and cafe, is feeling apprehensive. Mount Field is the closest national park to Hobart and is a popular destination for cruise ship visitors. "Cruise ships are both a blessing and a curse for our business here in the park," she said. In the past four years, the number of cruise ships visiting Tasmanian ports annually has more than doubled from 60 to 135 and is expected to reach 146 in the next two years. Mrs Power said some days, with little warning, 10 busloads of cruise ship visitors can arrive at the park just 15 minutes apart.  FULL STORY

HODGMAN ASLEEP AT WHEEL ON PORTS PROBLEM
Source: Mirage News
Will Hodgman has been caught out in Question Time regarding the dangerous lack of maritime pilots at the Port of Hobart.
Over the past 12 months Labor, unions and the community have been raising concerns about a shortage of marine pilots available to ensure that freight and cruise vessels can dock safely and efficiently at our ports. Shadow Roads and Infrastructure Minister David O’Byrne said there was currently only one pilot available in southern Tasmania. “One marine pilot has had to cover the port 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the past month,” Mr O’Byrne said.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIAN POTASH’S GERALDTON PORT AGREEMENT CONFIRMS SOP PATHWAY TO MARKET
Source: John Miller (Proactive Investors)
Australian Potash Ltd (ASX:APC) has signed an agreement with the Port of Geraldton that allows the company to continue to optimise logistics and port options for the Lake Wells Sulphate of Potash Project (SOP). The Joint Cooperation Agreement has been signed with the Mid West Ports Authority, the operator and manager of Geraldton Port. It provides for the port and Australian Potash to progress discussions on the export of Sulphate of Potash and import of Muriate of Potash. Australian Potash managing director and CEO Matt Shackleton said the agreement advanced a critical component of the development and operation of the Lake Wells SOP Project. “This agreement allows APC to further optimise the logistics and port options for the project,” he said.  FULL STORY

WA CATTLE BOUND FOR INDONESIA FROM PORT HEDLAND
Source: Zach Relph (The West Australian)
The second cattle consignment to set sail from Port Hedland this year is expected to depart by month’s end. Pilbara Ports Authority has confirmed a cattle shipment carrying about 2800 head, destined for Indonesia, is scheduled to leave Port Hedland on September 25. It is understood the consignment has been sourced primarily from Pilbara-based pastoral stations. Speaking with Countryman, PPA live export manager Jon Giles welcomed the shipment and said the port was eager to host more live cattle voyages, although none were planned for the rest of the year. “Last year we only handled one shipment through the port and this year it’ll be two,” he said. “We are ready and willing for more shipments if they arrive.”  FULL STORY

PORT HEDLAND DREDGING WRAPS UP
Source: Dredging Today
Pilbara Ports Authority has successfully wrapped up capital dredging works for the Channel Risk and Optimization Project (CROP) at the Port of Port Hedland, the world’s largest bulk export port. The $120 million, three-year project supports trade capacity growth in Port Hedland by optimizing channel depth and extending sailing windows, allowing port users to optimize tonnage on their vessels, they stated in their official announcement.  The dredging work, conducted by Jan De Nul, included the removal of ‘high spots’ in the channel, which optimizes navigable depths to allow deeper drafted vessels to safely navigate along the 42km shipping channel.  FULL STORY

SHIP WITH POOR ANIMAL WELFARE RECORD DUE AT NAPIER FOR CATTLE EXPORT
Source: Gerard Hutching (Stuff.co.nz)
A ship that has been stopped from taking a consignment of live cattle from Australia to China over biosecurity concerns is now sailing towards New Zealand to pick up 4700 cattle for China. Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) animal health and welfare director Dr Chris Rodwell confirmed he was considering an application for the export of livestock for breeding purposes. The Yangtze Fortune is due to berth at Napier Port this weekend, and if approved, the shipment would leave early next week. Last month 5400 breeding cattle were shipped from Napier to China, by its sister ship Yangtze Harmony, amid a Government review of live animal exports.  FULL STORY

PORT BOSS' SIX-FIGURE SALARY INCREASE HAS 'INFLAMED SITUATION' FOR WORKERS
Source: Stuff.co.nz
A $100,000 pay rise for Port Otago's chief executive is a "kick in the guts" for port workers fighting for better pay and conditions, a union says. The port company has released its latest annual report, which includes a dividend of $8.45 million to its shareholder, the Otago Regional Council. The 2019 report also disclosed the remuneration of chief executive Kerry Winders had increased by $100,000, and he is now paid between $610,000 and $620,000 – a rise of about 16 per cent. The increased was "a kick in the guys to our toilers of the waterfront who are seeking a modest pay rise", said John Kerr, spokesman for the Unions.  FULL STORY

HALL CONTRACTING COMPLETES PROJECT IN FIJI; EXPANDS FLEET WITH BACKHOE DREDGE
Source: Anna Townshend (International Dredging Review)
In May, Hall Contracting completed a project at Fiji’s first iron sand export facility. Dredging for the Lautoka Wharf project began in October 2018. In June, Hall Contracting also expanded its dredge fleet with the first Australian backhoe dredge, which started its work in Cairns at the Trinity Inlet shipping channel. AMEX Resources operates Lautoka Wharf under a long-term lease with the Fiji Ports Corporation Ltd., which awarded Hall Contracting the project in January 2018. The dredging opened a new berth pocket at the wharf.  FULL STORY

INDONESIA SEEKS TO ATTRACT MORE FOREIGN CRUISE SHIP TRAVELERS
Source: The Jakarta Post
Indonesia is seeking to boost its cruise ship tourism market as the number of foreign visitors arriving in the archipelago by cruise ship has increased in the past three years. According to a report by kompas.com on Sunday, the Tourism Ministry has set a target of welcoming at least 430,000 foreign tourists by cruise ships this year. "The figure represents a 20 percent increase per year. Meanwhile, the target for Indonesian port calls in 2019 is 667, or an average increase of 17.7 percent per year," Tourism Ministry accelerated marine tourism head Indroyono Soesilo said as quoted by kompas.com.  FULL STORY

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