News & Media

31 January, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 611

HOW HAS CORONAVIRUS AFFECTED PORTS AND SHIPPING?
Source: Max Schwerdtfeger (Port Technology)
The first month of 2020 has seen numerous threats to free trade and the flow of cargo around the world, including escalating tensions between the US and Iran and Brexit. Among these is the coronavirus, the virus which as of 29 January 2020 has killed 132 people. There are currently 6,000 reported cases, more than the entire SARS outbreak in 2002-2003. China is the most powerful nation in the maritime world, being home to seven of the ten busiest ports on Earth and, in COSCO, the third largest container shipping line. Therefore, it is almost impossible for shipping to escape and knock-on effects down the global supply chain are inevitable.  FULL STORY

CYBER SECURITY GUIDE FOR PORTS RELEASED
Source: PortStrategy.com
A new UK cyber security good practise guide highlights the very real risk of cyber security breaches and the need for robust prevention strategies to protect financial, security and reputational interests. The ‘Cyber Security for Ports and Port Systems’ guide, published by The Institution of Engineering and Technology, with the UK Department for Transport, aims to help ports highlights what actions need to be taken and by who. “Cyber-attacks on port systems are no longer considered hypothetical or simply the stuff of fictional narrative,” said the guide, which noted how Maersk’s security setup left it open to an attack from the Maersk virus in June 2017. It stressed that the consequences of failing to address security risks could lead to serious injury or fatality, disruption or damage to port systems, loss of use of buildings, impact upon business operations and more.  FULL STORY

LLOYD’S LIST GLOBAL AWARDS 2019: CELEBRATING SUCCESS IN SHIPPING
Source: Richard Meade (Lloyds List)
Tough conditions mean tough choices and shipping companies are making critical decisions more frequently. The Lloyd’s List awards programme seeks to identify and celebrate the key drivers of our industry. For 23 years, Lloyd’s List has sought to promote innovation, excellence and leadership in shipping across the globe through its annual Awards programme. LLOYD’S List events from Asia to the Middle East to Europe and the Americas are now well-established waypoints in the industry calendar and reflect the international nature of maritime. This year, the creation of the Global Shipping Awards marks the logical next step in the evolution of our programme. FULL STORY

CHINA IMPORTS 300M TONNES OF COAL IN 2019 AS PRICES TUMBLE
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
Chinese coal imports jumped 7% last year to 300m tonnes as international prices for the fuel plunged to levels too attractive to resist.
The world’s biggest coal consumer managed to squeak its total imports in under an unofficial import goal thanks to a plunge in December volumes to just 2.8m tonnes, comprehensive customs data showed on Thursday, confirming preliminary estimates from last week. December’s imports were down from nearly 21m tonnes in November and 73% lower than the same month last year. “We think that likely understates the true [2019] increase in China’s imports,” said Commonwealth Bank commodities analyst Vivek Dhar in a note.  FULL STORY

WITH LNG, THE SHIPPING INDUSTRY COULD REACH ITS DECARBONISATION TARGET—BUT WRECK THE CLIMATE, STUDY FINDS
Source: Tim Daubach (eco-business.com)
Switching shipping to natural gas would mean more climate-disrupting methane leaks into the atmosphere. But due to a serious flaw in the industry’s decarbonisation efforts, it would still tackle climate change—on paper. Hopes have been pinned on LNG as a climate solution for the maritime industry, but switching vessels to the fuel would only serve to worsen shipping’s climate impact due to previously underestimated leakage of the climate super-pollutant methane, new research released this week has revealed. The study, by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), shows that much more methane than formerly thought escapes along the process of extracting the gas from the earth...  FULL STORY

CONTAINER SHIPPING TRACK AND TRACE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED
Source: The Maritime Executive
The Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA) has published a common set of processes along with data and standards for Track and Trace (T&T). The DCSA T&T standard comprises an information model and interface standards that can be freely downloaded from the DCSA website. The data model ensures track and trace data definitions are consistent for all users, leveraging any system. These definitions are based on the Industry Blueprint, published by DCSA and its carrier members in 2019, which established a consistent vocabulary and proposed a common set of industry processes.  FULL STORY

SEAFARER HAPPINESS DOWN AMID STRESS OVER NEW REGULATIONS, INCREASE IN RACISM
Source: World Maritime News
Workload stress caused by changes in regulations has been one of the three main factors impacting the seafarers’ happiness level just months before the IMO 2020 sulphur cap started. In particular, seafarers were experiencing mounting pressure surrounding inspections and audits to confirm vessels’ compliance, in addition to the demands of ‘day to day’ administration and paperwork, the latest Seafarers Happiness Index report, published by The Mission to Seafarers, revealed. As one respondent put it, “shipping is tricking itself if it thinks being safe on paper makes it safer on the water”. The report inferred that systems that are meant to raise standards are seemingly compromised if they are making seafarers more stressed.  FULL STORY

CAIRNS WELCOMES PRINCESS AND ROYAL CARIBBEAN AFTER PORT MAKEOVER
Source: Vanessa Wu (Cruise Passenger)
A $20 million major makeover of the Port of Cairns will allow the heritage port to welcome bigger cruise ships from April 2020 onwards. At the Port of Cairns, the wharves are being upgraded with mooring and berthing dolphins and the shipping channel is also getting widened and deepened. When complete, two ships of up to 300 metres in length will be able to dock at the new port at the same time. This means that even ships carrying more than 3,000 passengers will be able to pull up in the Port of Cairns. According to a statement from Ports North, the wharf upgrade project is “running to schedule and is expected to be completed by the beginning of April”.  FULL STORY

GOVERNMENT DISPUTES MARITIME UNION CLAIMS OF INADEQUATE CORONAVIRUS CHECKS AT PORTS
Source: Ashleigh Tullis (Illawarra Mercury)
The maritime union has claimed there is not adequate screenings in place to check for coronavirus infections on vessels arriving at Australian ports, including Port Kembla. The Maritime Union of Australia has raised concerns in Australia's biosecurity stating "there has been a failure to implement adequate checks" to ensure people arriving on ships are not infected with the virus. However, that is claim disputed has been disputed by the federal government. Wollongong MP Paul Scully sought assurances from NSW health minister Brad Hazzard that all vessels and personnel coming into Port Kembla will be screened by biosecurity staff.  FULL STORY

NEW PUBLIC FISHING PLATFORM AT BUNBURY PORT
Source: Mirage News
The McGowan Government will establish a public fishing platform at the Bunbury Service Jetty, allowing public access to the Bunbury Outer Harbour for the first time in more than 15 years. The investment delivers on an election commitment in the Plan for Bunbury to build a fishing platform for the Bunbury community. The Southern Ports Authority will move two pilot boats that utilise the jetty to its south-eastern end, freeing up significant space for a public fishing platform to be established on its north-western end. Structural and civil works are valued at $457,000, including $208,000 to establish the fishing facility and access components.  FULL STORY

NEW ZEALAND'S FIRST ELECTRIC PORT IN THE MAKING, CENTREPORT GENERAL MANAGER SAYS
Source: Jessica Long (stuff.co.nz)
CentrePort is having an electric makeover to reduce its carbon footprint and boost productivity. Six yellow and black straddle lifts will be replaced with an electric alternative on the way from French manufacturer Gaussin. And the diesel-run truck and trailers, called transfer vehicles, will also be thrown in for seven electric ones – a first for any New Zealand port. CentrePort general manager Mark Thompson said the environmentally-driven decision would reduce carbon by about 250 tonnes per annum and speed up transfers by about 20 per cent. That time saving would go a long way with the more than 100,000 containers handled on-site each year, he added.  FULL STORY

PROTESTERS SET TO GATHER NEAR PORT TARANAKI AGAINST LIVE ANIMAL EXPORT
Source: Christina Persico (Stuff.co.nz)
Protestors are set to gather near Port Taranaki on Friday  to demonstrate against the livestock ship Yangtze Fortune exporting about 4000 live cows to farms in China. The ship arrived at 12.45pm on Thursday and animal welfare advocates SAFE are organising a peaceful protest at the Ocean View Parade/Bayly St corner at 12.30pm, following on from a protest at the Ports of Auckland earlier in the week. Safe spokesperson Will Appelbe said the live export trade caused significant stress to the animals during their journey. Although the live export of cattle, sheep, goats and deer for slaughter has been banned since 2003, they can still be exported for breeding purposes.  FULL STORY

NORTHLAND RAIL LINE: $110M INVESTMENT 'HUGELY SIGNIFICANT'
Source: Denise Piper (Stuff.co.nz)
A nearly $110 million investment in Northland's rail has been described as "seriously significant" for the region's economy.
The $109.7 million package will invest in the North Auckland Line and help get trains to Whang─ürei's port at Marden Point. The funding comes from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) and is on top of a $95m maintenance investment announced in September 2019. Jones, who backs Northport taking on Ports of Auckland's work, said Northport was one of the only ports in New Zealand that did not have a rail connection.  FULL STORY

NAPIER TO BE PART OF RECORD-SEEKING CRUISE'S SCHEDULE
Source: Roger Moroney (NZ Herald)
Napier is set to play its part in a unique cruise ship visit which could end up staking a place in the Guinness Book of Records.
The Viking Cruises luxury liner Viking Sun has arrived in New Zealand waters on what the company is hoping will rewrite the record books for the longest continuous passenger cruise and is set to arrive at Napier Port, from Tauranga, at 11.45am on Friday. It will be on the 153rd day of the scheduled 245-day world cruise when it enters Hawke Bay, and for 56 of the 930 passengers aboard it will indeed be their 153rd day aboard — with another 92 to go.  FULL STORY

DRY DOCK 'MISSING PIECE' OF INFRASTRUCTURE FUND, SHIPPING FEDERATION SAYS
Source: Maia Hart (Stuff.co.nz)
The lack of funding for a dry dock in the Government's $8 billion infrastructure package is "deeply disappointing", the New Zealand Shipping Federation says. In a package roughly three times bigger than normal infrastructure spends, the Government announced $8b of a $12b package on Wednesday, with the majority going to roads, rail, and hospitals. The New Zealand Shipping Federation (NZSF) is the key representative body for New Zealand's coastal shippers. NZSF president Clive Glover said the Government needed to stop talking about coastal ships and actually do something substantive to show its support. The largest New Zealand dry dock, built at the Devonport Naval Base in 1888, is now too small to service larger vessels.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability