News & Media

17 April, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 622

SEATRADE AWARDS ANNOUNCES NEW AWARD FOR PORT AND TERMINAL TECHNICAL INNOVATION
Source: Seatrade Maritime News
In an exciting development, Seatrade Maritime is pleased to announce the launch of a new award for this year’s Seatrade Awards, which take place this September in London, UK. The Port and Terminal Digital Technology Award – presented in collaboration with TOC Events Worldwide - will recognise those spearheading the development and implementation of innovative technical solutions that are increasing operational efficiency, saving costs and optimising the performance across the port and terminal network.  FULL STORY

LNG WOES IN SPOTLIGHT AS JUNIOR'S CASH RUNS OUT
Source: Angela Macdonald-Smith (AFR.com.au)
Last weekend's landmark but inadequate deal by the OPEC-plus alliance to rein in production appears to have locked in a looming plunge in LNG prices over the next few months, pointing to a sharp drop in revenues for ASX-listed producers Woodside Petroleum, Santos, Oil Search and Origin Energy. The gloomy outlook for the LNG sector was underscored by news on Tuesday that Liquefied Natural Gas Ltd, an aspiring exporter from the US, has only enough cash to last until May and "urgently" needs to secure additional funding after a takeover deal with a Singapore-based suitor collapsed.  FULL STORY

KEEPING CONTAINERS IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN
Source: Shipping Australia
There has been a lot of noise made recently about container hire/detention charges.
Shipping lines are in the business of having satisfied customers. If you have a specific exceptional circumstance, and you are unable to meet your obligations, talk to your carrier as soon as you can.
Most shipping lines are willing to listen and make determinations on a case-by-case basis to reduce the financial burden during this difficult time. Be aware that shipping lines need their containers to carry out your business… shippers are among the first categories of people to experience difficulties when there is a shortfall in available containers, be they dry, food grade or reefer.  FULL STORY

UN AGENCIES FORMALLY CEMENT PARTNERSHIP TO TACKLE MARITIME LITTER AND HELP DELIVER SDG 14
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
Partnerships are essential in tackling the global issue of marine plastic litter.
The International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have formally signed an agreement to move forward and jointly implement the GloLitter Partnerships Project, initially launched in December 2019, with funding from Norway, to prevent and reduce marine plastic litter from shipping and fisheries. The agreement specifies how the agencies will jointly execute the project and marks the next step towards many strategic partnerships anticipated under the project.  FULL STORY

SHIPPING’S SUSTAINABLE FUTURE WILL BE FUELLED BY R&D, INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
As 2020 gets underway, ocean carriers and shippers are starting to absorb the real-world impact of the IMO’s Low Sulphur Fuel Cap regulations that came into full force on 1 January. As we reported in our last newsletter the IMO2020 rules require shipping companies to switch to vessel fuels with a maximum 0.5% sulphur content. These currently include low sulphur fuel oil (LSFO), liquefied natural gas (LNG), methanol and hydrogen. Shipping lines can also use scrubber technology to reduce exhaust emissions from traditional high sulphur fuel oil (HSFO).  FULL STORY

PORTS SECTOR CALLS FOR GREATER COVID-19 TRANSPARENCY
Source: Kim Ho (Infrastructure Magazine Aus)
Australia’s peak ports authority has highlighted the need for more transparency around government measures to curb the spread of COVID-19. Recent times have seen a heavy flow of information coming from federal, state and territory authorities outlining the measures in place to manage the COVID-19 pandemic and keep trade moving. Ports Australia has worked closely with industry and government to ensure those measures are well placed in keeping port staff safe, so they continue their essential service of providing Australia with what it needs to survive. Australian Border Force (ABF) has made clear that local authorities may enforce additional requirements over and above those outlined by ABF directives.  FULL STORY

COVID-19: SHIPPING REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS AT AUSTRALIAN PORTS
Source: Shipping Australia
Rolling update of the latest regulations that impact on shipping from Federal, State and Territory governments during the COVID-19 restricted period are provided on this page. When a new rule is issued then we will report it here first, later updating our other web pages. The information is presented firstly by jurisdiction and then by date so that the most recent information for each jurisdiction appears at the top. Developments under the Federal jurisdiction are listed first and then, within that jurisdiction, they are listed in reverse date order with the latest developments at the top. Developments in each of the States and Territories are presented after the list of Federal developments conclude.  FULL STORY

WESTPAC: COAL BUCKLING, IRON ORE NEXT
Source: David Llewellyn-Smith (Macrobusiness.com.au)
A global pandemic crushes resources demand, particulary for but not limited to, crude oil. Review of the COVID–19 pandemic and its impact on economic activity resulted in significant revisions to our global growth forecasts with a deepening recession in the global economy. Westpac is now forecasting a 1.5% contraction in world output for 2020, with the G3 declining by 6.8%. With an expected similar contraction in industrial production this represents a significant destruction of demand for resources, particularly for energy. On the supply side, disruptions to date have been more mixed between commodities. Our thoughts on the outlook for the key economies have been detailed in the April Market Outlook and flow directly into the revisions made to our commodity forecasts.  FULL STORY

BRISBANE CRUISE TERMINAL STILL SET TO OPEN
Source: Darren Cartwright (Brisbane Times Aus)
Brisbane's new multimillion-dollar international cruise terminal will still open in October despite the industry being in lockdown because of the COVID-19 crisis. The terminal is slated to accept its first ship, the Carnival-owned Pacific Dawn, at 6am on October 3 at Luggage Point. A Port of Brisbane representative said it was too early to determine if the first cruise to depart from the port would need to be rescheduled. "Given the fact that the government has introduced a temporary ban on cruising, as they have on international flights, with no indication as to when it will be lifted, it is too early to understand how this crisis will impact future seasons," the spokesperson said.  FULL STORY

LARGE-SCALE SEARCH FAILS TO FIND MALE WORKER WHO FELL FROM A COAL CARRIER OFF THE CENTRAL COAST
Source: Newcastle Herald Aus
A man who had fallen from a coal carrier that was waiting to enter the Port of Newcastle off the Central Coast on Wednesday is presumed dead after he could not be found. A day-long search involving multiple aircraft concluded at sunset. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said the decision to call the search off was "based on expert medical advice that the time frame for survival ended at last light". The man is believed to have gone overboard from the Marshall Islands-flagged Western Marine at about 3.30am, but was not known to be missing until several hours later.  FULL STORY

THE TROUBLED RUBY PRINCESS MAY NOT BE LEAVING PORT KEMBLA AS PLANNED
Source: Glen Humphries (Illawarra Mercury)
Just under half the Ruby Princess crew tested in Port Kembla on Thursday have coronavirus.
Last Thursday , 97 crew showing symptoms of possible infection were tested. Of those 46 tests - 49 per cent - came back positive and 50 were negative; one test was yet to be returned as of Friday night.
Overall 52 people still onboard have COVID-19, while 11 people have been taken off the Ruby Princess and entered NSW hospitals. "These results are not unexpected," said a statement from NSW Health, "and in many cases represent resolving illness and part of the attempt to allow critical staff onboard to return to work and prepare the vessel for departure as well as support their colleagues still in isolation onboard the vessel."  FULL STORY

WOODSIDE SALES REVENUE PLUNGES OVER 20%
Source: TheWest.com.au
Woodside Petroleum has posted a more than 20 per cent fall in first-quarter sales revenue, hurt by reduced trading activity and lower unit prices for its oil and natural gas production. Its average sales prices for its products during the quarter amounted to $US45 per barrels of oil equivalent (boe), more than $US10 weaker than a year earlier. Oversupply and a slump in gas demand amid restrictions across several countries due to the coronavirus pandemic weighed on liquefied natural gas prices over the quarter. Last month, Woodside slashed its planned spending for fiscal 2020 by about $US2 billion ($A3.2 billion) and deferred key projects to stave off the impact from the pandemic and low oil prices.  FULL STORY

LARGEST CONTAINER CRANE ASSEMBLED AT PORT OF TAURANGA, READY TO START WORK NEXT WEEK
Source: NZ Herald
The Port of Tauranga's newest and largest container crane has been moved into position and is gearing up to start work next week. The new crane will be able to load and unload container ships up to 49 metres or 19 containers wide, compared with the 18 container reach of the Port's other large cranes. Crane operations at the container terminal were restricted during the lockdown due to shift patterns introduced to keep port workers separated and safe. The Port's ninth ship-to-shore gantry crane arrived in parts from Ireland in mid-February on a special-purpose delivery ship.  FULL STORY

'UNSUSTAINABLE': CHARITY SLAMS NEW ZEALAND OVER SEAFARER WELFARE
Source: Gary Dixon (TradeWindNews.com)
Human Rights at Sea has strongly criticised the New Zealand government over what it called the "precarious" state of welfare support for seafarers visiting its ports. In a new report, called New Zealand: Under-Funding of Seafarers’ Welfare Services and Poor MLC Compliance, the UK charity claimed the long-term maintenance of valued seafarers' centres remains under constant threat due to the lack of financial and logistical sustainability. Human Rights at Sea (HRAS) blamed the government and the local maritime industry. The issue pre-dates the coronavirus pandemic, the non-profit group added. Shoreside welfare services have been suspended in New Zealand due to the Covid-19 outbreak.  FULL STORY

TARANAKI LOCALS LAUNCH PETITION TO END LIVE EXPORT
Source: Scoop.co.nz
The live animal export ship Yangtze Harmony arrived in Port Taranaki yesterday to collect 4,450 cows, expected to depart tomorrow. This is the third live export ship to berth in New Plymouth this year. SAFE and other local groups want to see the practice of live export come to an end. SAFE Campaigns Manager Marianne Macdonald says, "Considering the strong local opposition to the live export trade within the Taranaki community, it’s concerning that the Taranaki Regional Council is continuing to enable this cruel industry."  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability