News & Media

01 May, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 624

MARITIME BODIES SEEK PMO INTERVENTION TO BRING BACK STUCK SEAFARERS
Source: International Shipping News
Thousands of Indian seafarers are currently stuck aboard cruise and cargo vessels in far off waters, and the country may face disruption in supply chain if they are not brought back, maritime bodies said on Sunday. With the Indian airspace remaining closed for domestic and international passenger flights, the bodies have sought intervention of the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) for devising a strategy to bring back such “essential supply workers”. India is the second largest supplier of seafarers, after the Philippines. As per industry estimates, about one lakh seafarers are engaged in Indian and foreign flag cargo vessels across the globe.  FULL STORY

CYBEROWL NABS €2 MILLION TO INCREASE GLOBAL MARITIME CYBER SECURITY
Source: Charlotte Tucker (EU-Startups)
UK-based but globally-minded CyberOwl, a cyber curity startup whose platform helps to safeguard transport and infrastructure systems, has raised a further €2 million to help expand its business in the maritime sector. CyberOwl, founded in 2016, provides early warning of cyber security breaches in assets such as ships, ports, industrial plants and infrastructure and sets out clear priorities on how to tackle them. Maritime security is a hot topic right now, with the International Maritime Organisation having ordered fleet operators to address their cyber security by 1 January 2021, due to increasing targets by cyber criminals and facing pressure from regulators.  FULL STORY

'NO RISK TO THE PUBLIC': SHIPPING AUSTRALIA HITS OUT AT COVID-19 RESTRICTIONS
Source: Tom Major (ABC Rural)
International seafarers pose little risk to the public and port access restrictions imposed by some states are not in line with national recommendations, an industry lobby claims. On April 9 the National Cabinet agreed that states and territories should implement a "consistent and immediate exemption" to COVID-19 rules for ships other than cruise liners. The Cabinet agreed vessels arriving within 14 days of their last international port of call could dock, as long as crew remained aboard. But last month Maritime Safety Queensland ruled that docking be delayed until 14 days had passed since a ship left its last foreign port.  FULL STORY

SEA-AIR AND COASTAL SHIPPING LOOK MORE VIABLE FOR CARGO HEADING DOWN UNDER
Source: Sam Whelan (The Load Star)
Shippers should consider options such as air-sea cargo and coastal shipping to send goods to Australia and New Zealand. According to CH Robinson, it’s vital to explore a variety of transport modes to keep supply chains moving. Andrew Coldrey, CH Robinson’s vice president for Oceania, said: “The airfreight market is fluid and changing daily, therefore it may be beneficial for international goods to be transported using both air and ocean shipping.” Indeed, forwarders are using Asian hubs such as Shanghai and Hong Kong to tranship airfreight to containerships bound for Australasia, avoiding the dearth of available air cargo capacity and taking advantage of rock-bottom intra-Asia ocean rates, with the most common routes from Europe and the US.  FULL STORY

BHP STUDYING IRON ORE EXPORT EXPANSION AT PORT HEDLAND
Source: Daniel Gleeson (International Mining)
BHP says it is looking into options to increase its iron ore export capacity at Port Hedland, in Western Australia, with the potential for a 40 Mt/y boost if “market conditions allow”. The company is currently focused on hitting its 290 Mt/y capacity (on a 100% basis) in the medium term, but it said it wanted to be able to respond to further growth opportunities in the future if conditions allow. BHP, prior to the spread of the COVID-19 virus, said it expected to ship 273-286 Mt of iron ore on a 100% basis in its 2020 financial year to June 30, 2020. A public consultation on the expansion plan has begun ahead of BHP submitting an application to the Western Australia Government to gain a licence for this increased iron ore export capacity.  FULL STORY

FORTESCUE POSTS 10% RISE IN Q3 IRON ORE OUTPUT
Source: Bruno Venditti (Mining.com)
Fortescue Metals ASX: (FMG) has upgraded its guidance for 2020 iron ore shipments to 175-177 million tonnes, based on strong operating performance year-to-date. The company reported third-quarter iron ore shipments of 42.3 million tonnes, 10% higher than 38.3 million tonnes a year earlier. Year-to-date shipments are at 130.9 million tonnes. Fortescue CEO Elizabeth Gaines “Fortescue is a core supplier of iron ore to China and we see strong ongoing demand for our products and anticipate a steady recovery in economic activity in that market.” Fortescue CEO Elizabeth Gaines said. FULL STORY

SOUTHERN PORTS PROJECTS SUPPORTING LOCAL JOBS
Source: Mirage News
South-West company awarded tender for civil works at Bunbury Port South-West company Carbone Bros. has been awarded the tender to complete road and parking works within the Southern Ports Authority, Port of Bunbury precinct. The project will upgrade the road entrance to Berth 8, and will improve the flow of traffic along Leschenault Drive by providing designated parking areas for trucks entering the berth. The Leschenault Drive road works compliment other major works underway at Berth 8 to improve the longevity of the berth structure and provide greater efficiencies for operations.  FULL STORY

PORT OF MELBOURNE RAIL PROJECT START LOOMS
Source: Australasian Transport News
June 1 to see consumer-funded infrastructure initiative kick off Port of Melbourne’s (PoM’s) Port Rail Transformation Project (PRTP) is set to go ahead with all of the project’s preconditions being completed, the port’s managers confirm. The $125 million initiative will involve significant rail infrastructure works and a new rail operating framework inside the port that will provide an alternative to moving containers by trucks, it says. The project is being funded through an increase in the tariff of $9.75 per twenty-foot equivalent unit (TEU) on full import containers, to take effect today.  FULL STORY

IA PORT BOTANY RAIL DUPLICATION MOVE BACKED
Source: Australasian Transport News
NSW Ports welcomes Infrastructure Australia’s recognition of project’s importance Port Botany Rail Line Duplication and Cabramatta Passing Loop project are now on Infrastructure Australia’s Infrastructure Priority List. Infrastructure Australia chief executive Romilly Madew draws specific attention to the critical role Port Botany plays as Sydney’s primary container port. "Port Botany handles 99 per cent of NSW’s container demand, making it a critical international gateway for Australia and a backbone asset for economic product within Sydney and New South Wales," Madew says.  FULL STORY

PORT OF WEIPA MAINTENANCE DREDGING SET TO BEGIN
Source: Jessica Casey (Dry Bulk)
North Queensland Bulk Ports (NQBP) Corp. CEO, Nicolas Fertin, said the dredge vessel TSHD Brisbane is due to begin work within the Port of Weipa from early May 2020. “Across all our ports, NQBP is balancing our number one priority, the health and safety of people, with the criticality of our ports,” Fertin said. “In the same way we maintain roads and rail lines for freight transport, we need to look after our port infrastructure to keep trade flowing. “Regular maintenance dredging ensures efficient, navigable shipping depths for our port users. “Given the current environment, we have been working closely with Rio Tinto and other port users and stakeholders to align control measures to support safe and efficient operations.”  FULL STORY

T&G GLOBAL SUPPORTS NZ SMALL BUSINESSES WITH APPLE SHIP CHARTER TO EUROPE
Source: freshplaza.com
T&G Global has chartered a ship to take about 31 million apples to Antwerp, as a way around potential container shortages and port closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Baltic Spring is on Tuesday and Wednesday loaded the last apples from Hawke’s Bay at Napier Port, after a last-ditch packing effort over the weekend. Craig Betty, Director of Operations for T&G Global says: “In the current climate, it was risky relying completely on our usual shipping programme and we needed to do everything possible to support our growers and get their fruit to markets in Europe. So, we pulled out all the stops. We have 5,400 pallets going on the Baltic Spring, most of it is JAZZ, Braeburn and Pink Lady apples.  FULL STORY

CORONAVIRUS: CRUISE SHIPS SET SAIL, LEAVE DEBT BEHIND
Source: Rachael Kelley (Stuff.co.nz)
Cruise ships have set sail from New Zealand waters because of the Covid-19 pandemic, but they have left a debt of marine fees in their wake. Environment Southland is seeking to recover more than $300,000 in marine fees that have not been paid by ships that had visited Fiordland this season. It will also suffer a $700,000 loss in marine fees from ships cancelling stops there after they were banned from New Zealand waters. The agenda for an Organisational Performance and Audit Committee meeting held on Wednesday says there was $344,061 still outstanding from cruise ships, which was due on 20 April 2020. Staff are following up with the agent, it says.  FULL STORY

LOG TRADE TO RESUME IN SOUTH CANTERBURY FOLLOWING INDUSTRY JAM
Source: Al Williams (Stuff.co.nz)
South Canterbury's log export industry is set for a long-awaited resumption after taking a hit during the Covid-19 pandemic.
TPT Forests shipping manager Jason Smith confirmed the 32,000 tonne bulk carrier Hainan Island is scheduled to arrive in Timaru on Sunday to pick up 22,000 cubic metres of Blakely Pacific and Laurie Forestry logs bound for South Korea and China. The Western Maple, also a 32,000 tonne bulk carrier, would follow on May 5 and take 10,000 cubic metres of logs to China, he said. "Everyone is over the moon, it's nice to get back to work as it's a big industry."  FULL STORY

INTER-ISLAND SHIPPING OPERATORS BEGIN RESUMING SERVICES TODAY
Source: Inoke Rabonu (Fiji Sun)
Interlink Shipping Line Limited spokesperson Radhika Devi said the shipping company would be conducting health checks on those intending to board their vessels from last Sunday. With inter-island passenger travelling restrictions lifted today, inter-island shipping operators are leaving no stone unturned in its bid to provide a COVID-19 safe travelling environment to all its customers.
Interlink Shipping Line Limited spokesperson Radhika Devi said the shipping company would be conducting health checks on those intending to board their vessels from 26 April.  FULL STORY

INTERNATIONAL LAW AND CRUISE SHIPS: SAILING INTO STORMY WATERS
Source: Donald Rothwell FAAL (Lawyers Weekly)
The first inkling of the troubles ahead arose with the Diamond Princess which while on an East Asian cruise was denied access to several ports before arriving in Yokohama on 3 February. Once there, Japanese authorities were confronted with dealing with outbreaks of COVID-19 among passengers and crew, hospitalisation of those who were ill, and eventual repatriation of passengers to their home countries. Similar incidents have now been replayed with cruise ships in ports from Sydney, to Fremantle, to Uruguay, and Florida.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability