News & Media

29 May, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 628

PORTXCHANGE RESULTS IN SHORTER IDLE TIMES ON DEPARTURE
Source: Port News (Hellenic Shipping News)
A recent trial with the digital information platform PortXchange (formerly known as Pronto) at APM Terminals Rotterdam yielded a significant reduction in the average idle time on departure of Maersk vessels. This had benefits for everyone involved: the terminal, the shipping line, the ship agent and the nautical service providers. This had benefits for everyone involved: the terminal, the shipping line, the ship agent and the nautical service providers. Participants in the trial were APMT, Maersk, the ship agent Inchcape Shipping Services (ISS), the towing services Svitzer and Fairplay and the local pilots of Loodswezen. A baseline measurement among 177 ships had established that on average, vessels wait 47 minutes before leaving the quay after cargo handling at the terminal has been rounded off.  FULL STORY

CONTAINER SHIPPING FACES ITS LARGEST EVER DROP IN TEU-MILES
Source: Sam Chambers (Splash 24/7)
Clarkson Research is reporting that container shipping faces its most significant drop in TEU-miles ever.
“The container sector seems amongst the most exposed to the impacts of Covid-19, with consumer demand in key regions under significant pressure, and the decline in box trade in TEU-miles in 2020 (projected at -10.3%) expected to be the steepest on record,” researchers at the London-headquartered outfit wrote in the company’s most recent weekly report.  FULL STORY

BIMCO CALLS FOR HULL CLEANING STANDARD
Source: Malcolm Latarche (Ship Insight)
International shipping association BIMCO has moved a step closer to finishing a global set of guidelines needed to protect the marine environment from invasive species and reduce CO2 emissions. Currently, there is no common global standard for cleaning ships’ hulls to avoid transferring invasive aquatic species, nor for the potentially damaging debris washed off in the process. To ensure that hull cleaning can be carried out in a safe and environmentally sustainable way in the future, a global standard is essential. “The new in-water cleaning standard puts great emphasis on capturing what is removed from the ship, thereby ensuring that the marine environment is not negatively affected.  FULL STORY

IRON ORE PRICES SOAR AMID BRAZIL’S WORSENING COVID-19 CRISIS
Source: Tara Hamid (Australian Mining)
Brazil’s worsening COVID-19 crisis and the reduced shipment of iron ore from the South American country have led to a surge in global iron ore prices on the back of resilient demand from China. According to ASX market index, the spot price for benchmark 62 per cent iron ore delivered to China reached $US100 ($150) per tonne on May 26, up from around $US90 per tonne last month. The benchmark price last Wednesday peaked at $US107 ($161) per tonne, the highest it had been since October last year. The upward trend for iron ore prices are expected to continue, with Chinese steel production remaining resilient and Brazil’s COVID-19 restrictions further hampering iron ore production.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIAN BORDER FORCE EXTENDS CRUISE SHIP BAN
Source: Helen Hutcheon (Seatrade-cruise.com)
The current restriction on cruise ships entering Australian waters has been extended for a further three months until September 17.
An earlier suspension was due to end on June 17. The Australian Border Force said Friday any cruise ship capable of carrying more than 100 passengers that has left a foreign port is prohibited from operating in Australia. This includes direct arrivals and round cruises. Queensland, the Northern Territory, South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia currently have closed borders. When the ban on cruise ships was first announced on May 27 there were 28 international cruise ships in Australian waters, including Ruby Princess.   FULL STORY

APRIL EXPORT FIGURES HIGHLIGHT DEMAND
Source: Aidan Smith (Farm Weekly Aus)
APRIL was a busy month for live sheep and cattle exports from Western Australia with 133,828 sheep being exported from Fremantle, as well as 29,503 cattle leaving Fremantle, Broome and Wyndham for various destinations. A further 1423 sheep were exported via air freight from Perth to Malaysia for slaughter. Statistics from the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment show that the live export trade from WA to overseas markets is alive and well, on top of the high demand of WA livestock from the Eastern States. The vast majority of the sheep exported, 125,912, went to the Persian Gulf markets of Qatar (40,000) Kuwait (68,912) and Oman (17,000), while a small consignment went to Russia (7916).  FULL STORY

THREE-DAY DELAY FOR WA SHIP VIRUS TEST
Source: Rebecca Le May (The Young Witness)
West Australian health officials didn't test crew on a live export ship for coronavirus until three days after federal officials advised them several were suffering fevers. Premier Mark McGowan admits mistakes were made in handling the Al Kuwait livestock carrier which docked in Fremantle last Friday, conceding he didn't have all the facts when he took aim at federal agencies. The WA government was forced to back-pedal on Wednesday after complaining the federal Department of Agriculture didn't advise the state that three crew had fevers before it docked.
But an email was sent to the general inbox of WA's Public Health Emergency Operations Centre, and state health officials didn't board the vessel and start testing until Monday.  FULL STORY

PORT RAIL TRANSFORMATION PROJECT (PRTP), MELBOURNE
Source: Railway-Technology.com
Port of Melbourne (PoM) launched its new rail transformation project to reduce traffic congestion caused by trucks in the inner suburbs of Melbourne and across the region of Victoria in Australia. Port Rail Transformation Project (PRTP) will include major rail infrastructure works and a new rail operating framework within the Melbourne port. The main objective of the PRTP project is to increase the capacity of the rail terminal and enhance the efficiency of the terminal, while improving rail access to the port. The rail transformation project will support the economic recovery of Victoria in the post-Covid-19 scenario by providing jobs, in addition to improving freight movement and supply chain.  FULL STORY

MORE TRANSPARENCY FROM PORT OF MELBOURNE WITH STEVEDORES
Source: Big Rigs Aus
LANDSLIDE operators carrying freight at the Port of Melbourne will have greater transparency, fairness and certainty when it comes to how infrastructure charges and terminal access fees are levied by stevedores at the Port of Melbourne, thanks to advocacy led by the Victorian Transport Association. The measures, which include the establishment of a Voluntary Port of Melbourne Performance Model (VPPM) and a Draft Protocol governing how stevedores levy fees and charges, were outlined to the Association in a recent letter from Victorian Ports and Freight Minister Melissa Horne. The letter outlined that the Victorian Government would be developing the VPPM to address costs in the sector through improved pricing transparency and access co-ordination.  FULL STORY

PORT OF MELBOURNE DREDGING SEASON ENDS
Source: Dredging Today
The Port of Melbourne has just reported that their 2019/2020 dredging program is now complete. The company has presented a video about the dredging program, and how the dredging vessel, the Boskalis Magnor, is floated onto the semi-submersible Blue Marlin to be transported to its next destination. The port has ongoing dredging obligations to ensure the safe passage of ships visiting the port. As Melbourne’s population is growing larger, wider and longer vessels are visiting Melbourne to supply everyday household goods to Victorian families.  FULL STORY


SHIP APL ENGLAND CARRYING CARGO FROM CHINA LOSES CONTAINERS OVERBOARD IN ROUGH SEAS, AMSA INVESTIGATING
Source: Rachel Riga (ABC Aus)
The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) will investigate how a Singaporean cargo ship lost 40 containers off Australia's east coast when it docks in Brisbane today. The APL England was enroute from Ningbo, China to Melbourne when it lost dozens of containers after hitting rough seas about 73 kilometres south-east of Sydney, early on Sunday morning. AMSA said the ship experienced a temporary loss of propulsion and during that time it was rolling heavily which caused container stacks to collapse and 40 containers to fall overboard.  FULL STORY

CONTAINER SPOTTED OFF THE COAST AT PORT KEMBLA, SALVAGE CREW DISPATCHED
Source: Glen Humphries (Illawarra Mercury)
Shipping containers from the APL England have been spotted floating in the water as far south as Jervis Bay and as far north as Newcastle.
Locally there have been reports of containers floating off the coast near Kiama and Port Kembla.  A NSW Maritime spokeswoman said that was the same container and that tugs and salvage crews had were sent to the Illawarra on Thursday to locate and remove it. There were also reports of items washing ashore at Corrimal Beach but nothing was seen there on Wednesday night or on Thursday.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIA'S QUEENSLAND COAL SHIPMENTS COLLAPSE IN MAY
Source: Argus Media
The two largest coal export facilities in the Australian state of Queensland are on track to report multi-year shipping lows for May, with the other two major ports in the state also tracking behind average, driven by weaker demand. The 102mn t/yr capacity Gladstone port and 85mn t/yr Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal (DBCT) are each on track to ship less than 4mn t in May, according to initial shipping data. This compares with averages of 6mn t/month and 5.6mn t/month, respectively, in 2019, as demand falls on the Covid-19 pandemic.  FULL STORY

NAPIER PORT DELIVERS STRONG FIRST HALF BUT OUTLOOK IS UNCERTAIN
Source: Radio New Zealand
Napier Port has reported a strong first half profit on increased revenue but will not be paying a dividend.
The Hawke's Bay port company's net profit for the six months ended in March rose 40 percent to $12.8 million, with a 7.5 percent increase in revenue to $52.3m. The port's chief executive, Todd Dawson, said: "Napier Port is having a year of two halves".  The company had delivered on expectations set out when the company listed on the NZX last year, he said.  FULL STORY

DUNEDIN NO LONGER TO BE PORT OF CALL FOR SHIP
Source: Star News NZ
A shipping company carrying about 15% of the container volume through Port Otago has decided to stop coming to Port Chalmers.
The ship Xin Zhang Zhou will stop at Port Otago for the last time on June 3 and will then finish its visits to the country in Wellington. It was one of four partners of the "Anzac" service which travelled down the coast of New Zealand and back to China. Port Otago chief executive Kevin Winders said it was "disappointing" to lose the ship from the port. "It’s been a marginal service for a number of years and been reviewed every February," he said.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability