News & Media

26 June, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 632

SHIPPING COPING WELL WITH IMO 2020, BUT DISPUTE CASES MAY RISE
Source: Lee Hong Liang (Seatrade Maritime News)
The shipping industry has largely experienced a smooth sailing six months into the implementation of IMO 2020, though dispute cases are expected to increase and even drag on, according to an industry panel speaking during the Informa Markets Digital Maritime Week. The IMO 2020 global regulation on curbing sulphur emissions from ships was a very much anticipated event for the shipping industry, which has shown “tremendous resilience in coping with the use of very low sulphur fuel oil (VLSFO)”, said Lloyd’s Register (LR) regional consultancy manager Douglas Raitt, who was one of three panelists touching on the topic of IMO 2020: Industry Implementation Update, held by Seatrade Maritime News.  FULL STORY

INCHCAPE: WORLD OF PORTS LAUNCHES
Source: Splash 24/7
Monday was the opening of another very important chapter in the 173-year history of Inchcape Shipping Services with the launch of its World of Ports offering, a digital service giving owners and operators access to a wealth of unique information to ensure safe, compatible and efficient port calls. The constantly updated, single source solution gives customers information relating to over 4,600 ports, 15,000 terminals and 36,000 individual berths. “There is nothing else like it on the market. It’s going to be a game changer,” says Frank Olsen, the CEO of ISS, one of the world’s big three ship agents. World of Ports is built on proprietary data gathered by ISS staff over the course of the last decade and utilises a Google Maps interface.  FULL STORY

CRUISE INDUSTRY DOWNSIZING BEGINS WITH FIRST SALE OF A SHIP FOR SCRAP
Source: The Maritime Executive
The cruise industry is beginning a downsizing the likes of which have never been seen in the modern cruise business. While other segments of the shipping industry have experienced significant downturns prompting the wholesale scrapping of vessels, cruise shipping up until now has been on a continuous growth path. Faced with no definitive timeline for a return to service and uncertainty over the rate at which travellers will return to cruising, the cruise lines are struggling to improve their liquidity and reduce their monthly cash burn.  FULL STORY

QUEENSLAND PORTS BREAK COAL EXPORT RECORD
Source: Lydia Lynch (Brisbane Times)
Coal mining will remain a major industry in Queensland for "years to come" as the state exported a record amount of coal in 2019. Queensland exported 226 million tonnes of coal last year, the equivalent weight of 815,000 Airbus A380 superjumbos. Data from Queensland's ports revealed total coal exports of 226 million tonnes last financial year, 2018-19, beating the 223 million record set the year before. Most Queensland coal was exported to Japan, followed by China, India, Korea and Singapore. Queensland Resources Council chief executive Ian Macfarlane said the state's coal industry supported 261,000 full-time jobs and contributed $52.5 billion to Queensland's economy.  FULL STORY

PORT SUPPORTS YWAM MEDICAL SHIP DURING COVID-19
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
The Port of Townsville has announced it will provide much needed in kind support to North Queensland’s YWAM medical ship. YWAM MS, a world-class medical ship, has been docked in Townsville since March and will be homed in the Townsville Marine Precinct until October 2020. The six-month in-kind berthage support will help prevent the not-for-profit organisation from suffering financial impacts due to the impacts of COVID-19 which have forced the vessel to remain in Australia an unplanned seven months. YWAM Port Captain, Jeremy Schierer said that the medical ships had planned to remain in Papua New Guinea for all of 2020.  FULL STORY

NSW PORTS CEO REFLECTS ON COVID-19 IMPACT
Source: Container Management
NSW Ports’ CEO has reflected on the impact COVID-19 has had on the operators’ facilities and how it has led to a greater understanding of the critical nature of ports, freight and supply chains. The operators’ facilities at Port Botany and Port Kembla have remained open throughout the disruption, operating 24/7 to continue the flow of goods to support everyone in the Australian state. NSW Ports CEO, Marika Calfas, said: “To cope with COVID-19, port operators moved early to implement processes and introduce new measures that would safeguard critical port workers.”  FULL STORY

COAL PRODUCERS SET UP FOR COLLECTIVE NEGOTIATIONS WITH PORT OF NEWCASTLE
Source: Tara Hamid (Australian Mining)
The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is proposing to authorise the NSW Minerals Council and 10 coal producers to collectively negotiate their access to the Port of Newcastle for exports. The 10 producers that export coal through the Port of Newcastle and are applicants to the application are Glencore Coal, Yancoal Australia, Peabody Energy Australia, Bloomfield Collieries, Centennial Coal, Malabar Coal, Whitehaven Coal, Hunter Valley Energy Coal, Idemitsu Australia, and MACH Energy Australia. Since December last year, Port of Newcastle Operations (PNO) has been negotiating with individual coal producers, vessel agents, vessel operators and free-on-board (FOB) coal consignees to enter into bilateral long term discounted pricing arrangements.  FULL STORY

PORT TO SERVICE CARRAPATEENA
Source: Louis Mayfield (WhyallaNewsOnline)
A milestone contract has been secured for SIMEC Mining's Whyalla Port, signalling a new era of third-party use at the site. The facility has been selected as the preferred site to ship copper concentrate for OZ Minerals' $1.3 billion Carrapateena mine following a competitive tender process. The three-year contract is the first major deal secured by SIMEC Mining, an arm of British Billionaire Sanjeev Gupta's GFG Alliance operations. Containers of copper concentrate will be trucked from the mine, located 165 kilometres north of Port Augusta, to the Whyalla Port for consolidation. The copper will be shipped out in 5-10kt cargoes, with annual shipments gradually increased in conjunction with the rampup of the mine.  FULL STORY

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN PORTS WEATHERING PANDEMIC STORM
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
Marine pilots are now heavily kitted out in safety masks and gloves as they board those cargo and container ships to guide them into dock at 10 commercial ports across the state. Ship crews are also being forced to stay on board, despite having been at sea for many weeks. “South Australia has been a lot more resilient than we maybe anticipated at the beginning of all of this,” Stewart Lammin said from the wharves at Port Adelaide. “I would say there’s been about a 10 per cent reduction in import trade and exports are maybe down a couple of per cent, but that’s partly because of agricultural production, with the grain harvest being down last season.”  FULL STORY

AUTHORITIES CLAMP DOWN ON SHIPS WHERE SEAFARER CONTRACTS HAVE EXPIRED
Source: Sam Chambers (Splash 24/7)
Authorities around the world are now taking action against ships where seafarers have been working beyond their contracts, without necessarily fixing the key issue of flights for crew repatriation. On Friday the Berge Heng Shan was detained at Port Hedland by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) and told to fix three crewing-related deficiencies before it could depart. Two seafarers onboard the Berge Bulk ship were found to not have a valid seafarer’s employment agreement, another two have not been repatriated as per their employment agreement, while the ship had no repatriation plan for crew who had been working for longer than 11 months onboard.  FULL STORY

NZ PORT DETERMINED TO CONTINUE DEVELOPMENT
Source: PortStrategy.com
Port of Auckland pressing on with development plans despite an ongoing debate over its future. Ports of Auckland (POAL) has applied to Auckland Council for consent to deepen the city’s shipping channel to enable the Port of Auckland to handle bigger ships and more containerised imports. A resource consent hearing on the matter will be held this week. If consent is granted, work on deepening the channel could start in 2021. The application comes as the New Zealand government considers the fate of the port following a report, published last year, by the Upper North Island Supply Chain Strategy working group that recommended the closure of the Port of Auckland, development of Northport to capacity equivalent to POAL and continued operation of the Port of Tauranga.  FULL STORY

TIGHTER RULES AT TAURANGA PORT FOR FOREIGN BOAT ARRIVALS
Source: RNZ.co.nz
Tauranga health authorities have clamped down on sailors entering the country after a horror week for the government on pandemic border controls, but Auckland is holding off. The public health body for Bay of Plenty has taken action without waiting for an imminent move by Cabinet to tighten port security, requiring sailors from foreign boats to clear a negative test for Covid-19. Despite inaction from Auckland Regional Public Health, it said it understood a revised national policy was near completion. A spokesperson for the prime minister's office said changes to the border security at ports in New Zealand were under consideration by Cabinet and decisions were imminent.  FULL STORY

REPORT FINDS GISBORNE PORT DEATH CAUSED BY SNAPPED CABLE
Source: James Fyfe (NewsHub NZ)
A seaman on a ship loading logs in Gisborne died after a cable snapped under too much tension, according to a report published by the Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) on Thursday. The incident occurred at Eastland Port on April 3, 2019. Aaron Holman, TAIC's chief investigator of accidents, said crew on the Coresky OL were using a crane to tension a wire rope to secure a load of logs to the ship's deck when the cable snapped. "The wire rope was zig-zagged like a single bootlace over the cargo, through a series of pulleys held in place by foot wires that ran up the sides of the cargo."  FULL STORY

DEBARKER INSTALLED INTO PORT TARANAKI, ENHANCES PORT'S LOG OPERATIONS
Source: NZHerald.co.nz
The installation of a debarker machine at Port Taranaki ensures the company's export log operations are more efficient and ready to meet future changes to environmental standards. In a partnership between Port Taranaki and China Forestry Group New Zealand, a log debarker has started operation at Port Taranaki and will strip between 1200 and 1600 JAS (tonnes) of logs a day. Port Taranaki is the first port in the lower North Island to commission an on-site debarker, and its operation means full log vessels, both below deck and above deck, can be loaded at Port Taranaki and leave directly for international markets in Asia.  FULL STORY

PORT NELSON RESTRUCTURES LOGISTICS AND WAREHOUSING OPERATIONS
Source: Tim O’Connell (Stuff.co.nz)
A need for improved efficiencies in challenging times has seen Port Nelson restructure its logistics and warehousing operations.
The port has announced its warehousing and packing services have been consolidated into one operation, to be known as QuayPack. The Port said its restructure would allow QuayConnect's existing operation to work more closely with clients while continuing to move product from the top of the south to New Zealand centres and the international market. Port Nelson chief executive Hugh Morrison said the company did not envisage any staff cuts from the restructure.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability