News & Media

09 October, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 647

UN HUMAN RIGHTS ORGANISATIONS CALL FOR MORE ACTION FOR SEAFARERS
Source: The Maritime Executive
Saying that seafarers have become collateral victims of the measures to curb COVID-19, the United Nation’s human rights organizations added their voice to the many organizations calling for more actions. Highlighting an “unparalleled crisis” affecting hundreds of thousands of crew members and maritime workers, the UN organizations called on the business sector and others involved in the shipping industry to do more to address the plight of seafarers worldwide. Citing the 400,000 people currently stranded on vessels, and a similar number prevented from returning to ships to earn their living, due to COVID-19 related measures imposed by governments, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), the UN Global Compact, and the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights, issued a joint statement.  FULL STORY

SHIPPING HITS OUT AT UNILATERAL MOVE BY CHARTERERS
Source: Sam Chambers (Splash 24/7)
The global shipping industry is still digesting the news today that some of its largest clients will for the first time assess and disclose the climate alignment of their shipping activities. The brand new Sea Cargo Charter sets a “new benchmark for responsible shipping, transparent climate reporting, and improved decision making in line with United Nations decarbonization targets”, according to a release from the Global Maritime Forum. The Sea Cargo Charter is a global framework that allows for the integration of climate considerations into chartering decisions to favour climate-aligned maritime transport.  FULL STORY

IMO AND CMA CGM WORK TO RECOVER FROM CYBERATTACKS
Source: The Maritime Executive
The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Internet website and web-based services remained down for a third day as the UN organization works to recover from what it is calling “a sophisticated cyberattack against the organization’s IT systems that overcame robust security measures.” The attack comes as the organization that oversees the global shipping industry has been urging the maritime community to improve cybersecurity and has new guidelines pending for 2021 designed to create new safeguards in an increasingly technologically driven industry.  FULL STORY

GLOBAL CONSUMER GOODS CEOS WARN OF SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTION; INTERRUPTION “COULD PUSH COMPANIES AND COUNTRIES OVER THE EDGE”
Source: Shipping Australia Limited
Major global manufacturers and retailers of essential consumer goods, including food and hygiene products, have warned that anti-COVID restrictions in the maritime industry are “creating [a] huge disruption to global supply chains – including those for critical goods such as food and hygiene”. Governments must ensure the continued supply of goods. In an open letter to António Guterres, the head of the United Nations, the 31 CEOs of global-scale consumer goods companies, have called upon world governments to “ensure the supply of critical goods [and] to support the global economy”.  FULL STORY

INTERPOL ASKED TO ARREST CAPTAIN, SHIP OWNER OVER BEIRUT EXPLOSION
Source: Ellen Francis (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Lebanon has asked Interpol to issue arrest warrants for the Russian captain and owner of the ship that brought the explosive material that detonated at Beirut port in August, killing nearly 200 people, state media reported on Thursday. About two months after the explosion that injured thousands and ravaged the Lebanese capital, questions remain about why and how the cargo from the so-called floating bomb was abandoned in Beirut. Authorities have blamed it on the huge stockpile of ammonium nitrate, used for fertiliser but also for explosives, going up in flames after being stored in poor conditions at the port for years.  FULL STORY

DRY BULK SHIPPING RATES HAVE JUST HIT A NEW 2020 HIGH
Source: Greg Miller (Freight Waves)
More ocean shipping signals are flashing green. First came a recovery in the container sector, driven by surging U.S. consumer demand. Now comes a rebound in dry bulk, the world’s largest freight market in terms of volume. Rates for large bulkers known as Capesizes — ships carrying iron ore and coal that have a capacity of around 180,000 deadweight tons (DWT) — just hit year-to-date highs, driven primarily by industrial demand. The Baltic Exchange’s 5TC index assessed Monday’s time-charter equivalent (TCE) rates for Capesizes burning 0.5% sulfur fuel at $34,293 per day.  FULL STORY

PORTS AUSTRALIA LAUNCHES ITS PORT STRATEGY SUSTAINABILITY GUIDE, LAYING DOWN A MARKER FOR ALL PORTS
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
Ports Australia have launched their Port Strategy Sustainability Guide with the goal of a providing is members with a systematic and robust approach to sustainability as they prepare their strategies or evolve the work they have already done. In their release, Ports Australia’s CEO Mike Gallacher commented : “Ports are not just trade gateways, they’re community members operating along Australian coastlines which aren’t just beautiful locations, but socially and ecologically important environments.  FULL STORY

WA SHIP CREW MEMBER'S NEGATIVE COVID TEST
Source: Michael Ramsay (The West Australian)
A crew member from a cargo ship docked at Fremantle Port has tested negative to COVID-19, West Australian authorities have confirmed. The crew member aboard the Kota Legit vessel was tested after it emerged they had been unwell while the ship was at sea, WA Health said on Sunday. "The crew member is not ill and no other crew members onboard the ship have been reported with illness," WA Health said. "The ship can recommence activities and depart Fremantle to travel to its next port."   FULL STORY

IRON ORE PRICES TO REMAIN HIGHER FOR LONGER: TREASURY
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald
Iron ore prices are expected to remain higher for longer according to Treasury consultation that says Chinese hunger for Australia's most valuable export will counter improved supply from Brazil. Bulk metal prices have remained elevated during the coronavirus pandemic thanks to strong Chinese demand and supply issues that have hamstrung virus-stricken export rival Brazil.
Improved production in the South American nation is expected to bring down the price of iron ore in the coming months but consultation by Treasury suggests the price decline is not as sharp as initially feared.  FULL STORY

MOUNT GIBSON’S SHINE TO DELIVER FIRST IRON ORE BY MID 2021
Source: Vanessa Zhou (Australian Mining)
Mount Gibson Iron is targeting the delivery of first ore sales from the Shine iron ore project in Western Australia in mid-2021. The company aims for a direct shipping ore (DSO) production rate of 1.5 million wet metric tonnes a year based on stage one proven ore reserves of 2.8 million tonnes grading 59.4 per cent iron. The mine has a total Hematite mineral resource of 10.8 million tonnes grading 58.2 per cent iron. The stage one pit is forecast to yield around 2.9 million wet metric tonnes of lump and fines material over an initial period of two years. Mount Gibson stated that there was potential to extend the mine life by another two years by developing a stage two pit.  FULL STORY

ACCC PROPOSES EXEMPTION FOR TWO VITERRA GRAIN PORT TERMINALS
Source: Miragenews.com
The ACCC has today released draft determinations proposing to exempt the services provided by grain handler Viterra at its Port Adelaide Inner Harbour and Outer Harbor facilities from parts of the Port Terminal Access (Bulk Wheat) Code. Viterra applied to be exempt from parts 3 to 6 of the code at all six of its South Australian port terminals; however, the ACCC’s draft determinations do not propose to exempt the company’s Port Lincoln, Wallaroo, Port Giles, and Thevenard facilities. “Although Viterra is the dominant port service provider for South Australia’s bulk grain export market, we’ve formed the preliminary view that an increase in competition justifies a reduction in regulation at Inner Harbour and Outer.  FULL STORY

MAGNETITE MINES GEARS UP FOR IRON ORE SORTING TRIAL AT RAZORBACK
Source: Stockhead
Magnetite Mines is doubling down on its belief that ore sorting will improve the economics of its 4 billion tonne Razorback iron ore mine in South Australia. It has now signed an agreement with NextOre for the supply of a mobile bulk ore sorting plant using the CSIRO-developed magnetic resonance (MR) technology that promises to make it simpler to sort low-grade material from the high-grade stuff. Magnetite Mines (ASX:MGT) will pay NextOre a non-refundable deposit of $100,000 and further staged payments of $700,000 for the supply of the plant at Razorback for sorting magnetite ore during the trial period for mine feasibility analysis.  FULL STORY

PORT OF MELBOURNE RELEASES 30 YEAR DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
Source: Port News
The Port of Melbourne has released the final version of its 30 year Port Development Strategy 2050. Port of Melbourne CEO, Brendan Bourke says the 2050 PDS is a comprehensive plan for the future development of the Port, developed through consultation with stakeholders, and responds to Victoria’s future trade needs. “Throughout the COVID-19 environment we have seen the essential role that freight plays in underpinning our economy and the critical role of the Port in operating 24/7, 365 days a year and delivering the goods Victorians and Australians need every day,” said Mr Bourke.  FULL STORY

DIESEL, BATTERIES AND BIOFUELS: SETTING OUR FERRIES ON COURSE FOR A GREEN FUTURE
Source: International Shipping News
If Greta has taught us one thing, it’s that trains are good and planes are bad. But without access to a zero-carbon yacht, what do you do if you need to cross Cook Strait? At the moment, all public ferries operating here run on fossil fuels. Smaller boats use diesel that’s akin to what’s sold at petrol stations. But large vessels, including the Cook Strait ferries, burn a fuel made of leftovers from the refining process, says engineer Brent Yardley.  FULL STORY

CRUISE SHIPS WORLDWIDE WITH MORE THAN 250 PEOPLE WILL TEST ALL PASSENGERS, CREW FOR COVID-19
Source: Lincoln Wicked Local
Cruise lines around the world have committed to testing every passenger and crew member for COVID-19 before boarding, the industry’s leading trade group, Cruise Lines International Association, said Tuesday. “CLIA ocean cruise line members worldwide have agreed to conduct 100% testing of passengers and crew on all ships with a capacity to carry 250 or more persons – with a negative test required for any embarkation,” Bari Golin-Blaugrund, vice president of strategic communications for Cruise Lines International Association, told USA TODAY in a statement.  FULL STORY

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