News & Media

06 November, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 651

NEW ICS REPORT SHEDS LIGHT ON DIVERSITY IN SHIPPING
Source: Mike Schuler (GCaptain.com)
Women make up just 7.5 percent of the world’s seafarers, according to a first-of-its-kind report looking into diversity within the shipping industry.
The report was released this week by the International Chamber of Shipping. It surveyed more than 200 shipping companies across the world on issues related to diversity in the global shipping labour force. The report revealed that while 30 percent of companies employ women on their board and close to 60 percent of companies have female officers, just 7.5 percent of total seafarers were female. Three-quarters of the companies surveyed offered some sort of maternity leave policy. The report also provides a list of recommendations for immediate improvement, including setting a baseline and targets for improved corporate diversity and inclusion policies in the coming years.  FULL STORY

EVERY SHIP’S EFFICIENCY RATING WILL BE MADE PUBLIC, SAYS ICS
Source: Sam Chambers (Splash 24/7)
The ‘A’ to ‘E’ operational efficiency rating of every ship above 5,000 gt will be made fully public and updated on an annual basis, according to the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS). This rating system could be adopted as soon as IMO’s MEPC 75 meeting which starts on November 16, with further guidelines filled out at MEPC 76 next year. “These ratings will be in the public domain and so visible to all,” an ICS spokesperson commented. “The exact mechanism is being finalised, although clearly the system won’t function unless the ratings are visible. With regards to when, we anticipate this will be done as part of the annual IMO DCS reporting and verification for fuel use.” This would mark a decisive break from years of secrecy over ship efficiency and emissions data.  FULL STORY

SHIPPING DEMAND TO SUFFER AFTER WAVE OF NEW LOCKDOWNS
Source: Nikos Roussanoglou (Hellenic Shipping News)
Freight rates are about to face renewed downward pressure, on the back of a new wave of lockdowns around the world, with Europe being the most obvious example. Shipbrokers anticipate a new blow on demand for shipping, which will inevitably translate to lower freight rates moving forward. In its latest weekly report, shipbroker Allied Shipbroking said that “it has been a difficult and troublesome year so far for the global markets and the economy. Since the onset of the pandemic fundamentals across the board have been set on a sharp tail spin, with most markets and trades receiving a strong initial shock at the end of the second quarter of the year and since then have been suffering from the numerous “aftershocks” that have been coming in. Having entered now the final quarter of the year, it seems that the difficulties being faced are far from over.  FULL STORY

CHINA TO EXPAND BAN ON AUSTRALIAN IMPORTS TO COPPER
Source: Mining.com
China has ordered traders to stop purchasing at least seven categories of Australian commodities, including coal, barley, copper ore and concentrate, sugar, timber, wine and lobster. Beijing and Canberra have been locked in a geopolitical dispute since April after Australia pushed for an international inquiry into the origins of the covid-19 pandemic. Reports by the South China Morning Post suggest that copper and sugar exports from Australia into China will be halted, after the country banned the import of timber from Queensland and barley shipments from an Australian grain exporter. Australian rock lobster shipments were also delayed in Shanghai on the weekend.  FULL STORY

PORTS AUSTRALIA SHARES SUSTAINABILITY GUIDE JOURNEY WITH USA
Source: Ports Australia
Ports Australia has joined the American Association of Port Authorities virtual Energy & Environment Seminar & Expo to share knowledge on sustainability planning and how the Port Sustainability Strategy Development Guide (PSSDG) was created. CEO, Mike Gallacher was joined by Ports Australia’s Sustainability Working Group’s Chair and NQBP’s Senior Manager Sustainability and Environment, Simona Trimarchi to provide a 30 minute presentation on the ethos of sustainability, its relevance for ports, and why this made the PSSDG essential.  Mike and Simona highlighted … how diverse the environments in which Australian ports operate and why that meant a how-to guide on sustainability planning had to be adaptable.  FULL STORY

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT URGED TO NATIONALISE KWINANA OIL REFINERY AND CREATE DOMESTIC SHIPPING FLEET TO SECURE SOVEREIGN
Source: Maritime Union of Australia via Mirage News
The Federal Government should examine purchasing BP’s Kwinana oil refinery, rather than allowing it to be closed, in a move that would not only save 600 jobs but drastically improve Australia’s fuel security, according to the Maritime Union of Australia. The union believes that by nationalising the refinery — one of only four in Australia and the only facility not located on the east coast — along with expanding domestic oil stockpiles, the nation’s ability to withstand supply issues caused by pandemic, conflict, natural disaster, or economic shock would be greatly improved.  FULL STORY

STEVEDORES’ REVENUES GROW DESPITE LARGEST DROP IN CONTAINER VOLUMES IN A DECADE
Source: Australian Competition and Consumer Commission
Stevedores’ revenues and profit margins increased overall in the last financial year despite the global pandemic causing the largest contraction in container volumes in a decade, according to the ACCC’s Container Stevedoring Monitoring Report 2019‑20. Overall revenues grew in 2019-20, largely as a result of stevedores increasing terminal access charges. Revenue from these charges, previously called infrastructure charges, rose by 51.9 per cent in aggregate for monitored ports compared to 2018-19.  FULL STORY

STRIKE TO PRODUCE FIRST PILBARA IRON ORE IN 2021
Source: Vanessa Zhou (Australian Mining)
A new iron ore mine is set to emerge in the Pilbara region of Western Australia after junior miner Strike Resources completed a feasibility study (FS) for the Paulsens East project. The project is envisioned to produce six million tonnes of iron ore over an initial four-year mine life. Three-quarters of the production will comprise direct shipping ore (DSO) lump at 62 per cent iron. Strike considers the project to bear a low technical risk as it opts for conventional mining, crushing and screening, as well as direct transport to Port Hedland for export. “The completion of the feasibility study is another key milestone achieved in moving Paulsens East towards production,” Strike managing director William Johnson said.  FULL STORY

LEIGH CREEK PUSHES HUGE $2.6 BILLION BROWN COAL GASIFICATION PLANT FOR FERTILISER
Source: Michael Mazengarb (Renew Economy)
Plans to establish a $2.6 billion coal gasification plan using the deep brown coal resources at the old Leigh Creek mine in South Australia have been pushed along after an initial feasibility study suggested the project could also target the low cost production of fossil-fuelled hydrogen. The Leigh Creek Energy Project is seeking to tap into brown coal reserves in South Australia left idle by the closure of the state’s two highly polluting and ageing coal fired power generators, using an ‘in-situ’ coal gasification process that involves the production of syngas directly within the coal deposits.  FULL STORY

PORT OF MELBOURNE’S SUSTAINABILITY ACHIEVEMENTS
Source: Imogen Hartmann (Infrastructure Magazine)
In its recently released 2020 Sustainability Report, Port of Melbourne (PoM) outlined it’s  approach to sustainability and how it handles more than one-third of Australia’s container trade, contributing around $7.5 billion in trade each year. The report, which outlined how PoM has managed its material environmental, social and governance risks and opportunities amid a challenging operating year, also found that it contributed about $6 billion to the Victorian economy. Some key findings include - Each vessel visiting the port brings with it an average $1.85 million in state economic benefits and, the port facilitated 3,008 ship arrivals and 2.9 million twenty-foot-equivalent container units (TEUs).  FULL STORY

SOUTH32 EDGES CLOSER TO EXTENDING DENDROBIUM MINE LIFE BY 25 YEARS
Source: Vanessa Zhou (Australian Mining)
South32 has received New South Wales backing to proceed with the extension plan for its Dendrobium coal mine in the Illawarra region. The proposed $1 billion extension is aimed at increasing metallurgical coal extraction from 5.2 million tonnes a year of run-of-mine (ROM) coal to 78 million tonnes from two new underground mining areas. The project is expected to expand the Dendrobium mine workforce from around 400 to 500 personnel and extend the mine’s life by another 25 years. According to the New South Wales Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) , 81 per cent of the 775 public submissions received gave their support for the project…  FULL STORY

ADANI RENAMES ITS AUSTRALIAN MINING UNIT, ON TRACK TO PRODUCE FIRST COAL NEXT YEAR
Source: James Thornhill (The Print)
The company has renamed itself Bravus Mining & Resources to mark the 10-year anniversary of its operations in Australia, & the Carmichael project's move into the construction phase. India’s Adani Enterprises Ltd. renamed its Australian mining unit in a move critics see as aimed at distancing the rest of the conglomerate from a contentious new coal development. Adani last year won approval to proceed with the 10 million-tons per-annum Carmichael thermal coal project after a decade-long struggle with regulators and environmental protesters.  FULL STORY

PORT OF TAURANGA CARGO VOLUME IMPACTED BY COVID-19
Source: Sunlive.co.nz
Port of Tauranga, New Zealand’s international hub port, this week reported flat earnings in the first quarter of the financial year, as Covid-19 continues to have an impact on supply chain efficiency and the global economy. From July 1 2020 to September 30 2020, Port of Tauranga handled nearly 6.4 million tonnes of cargo, a 5 per cent decrease on the same period last year. Containerised cargo decreased by 8 per cent to 287,670 TEUs. Imports were the same as the first quarter last year, and exports were down 8 per cent. Log exports are performing in line with forecasts of 6.2 million tonnes for the full year, but remain vulnerable to variable international demand.  FULL STORY

MAJOR UPGRADE AT EASTLAND PORT
Source: GisborneHerald.co.nz
Eastland Port is preparing for the most extensive infrastructure upgrades and developments it has seen in more than 100 years, to help support, future-proof and grow the economy of Tairawhiti. The cornerstone of this is the Twin Berth project, Eastland Port's major redevelopment project to expand the port's marine infrastructure. It will allow for two Handymax (150-200m long) ships to be berthed at once, and meet the needs of the region's thriving industries. “While logs are our primary export today, we want to create a coastal container terminal to expand the options for exporters, enabling more types of goods to be exported and imported via the blue highway,” says chief operating officer Andrew Gaddum.  FULL STORY

HUGE LIVESTOCK SHIP ARRIVES IN TIMARU
Source: Doug Sail (Stuff.co.nz)
The world's largest purpose built livestock ship arrived in Timaru under the cover of darkness late on Tuesday. The 176.7-metre long Ocean Drover is scheduled to load about 7945 live cattle for China. It will be the second shipment of live cattle to leave New Zealand since the Gulf Livestock 1 capsized in a typhoon in the East China Sea on September 2 with 41 people, including two New Zealanders, and 6000 cattle perishing on a voyage that started from Napier on August 14. Anti-live animal export protesters are planning a picket on Wednesday.  FULL STORY

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