News & Media

27 November, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 654

5 MARITIME SUSTAINABILITY TRENDS FOR 2021
Source: International Shipping News (Hellenic Shipping News)
According to the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), “ships transport roughly 90% of world trade and account for 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions.” The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is having a large impact on sustainable operations for ocean freight. Here are five environmental sustainability trends coming in 2021. Potential decarbonization and ETS. The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) met last week to discuss the new IMO short-term draft amendments that would require ships to adjust their operations and equipment to reduce carbon emissions intensity by 40% by 2030 compared to 2008.  FULL STORY

SHIPPING NEEDS TO ENSURE SEAFARERS ARE PRIORITISED FOR COVID-19 VACCINES
Source: Marcus Hand (Seatrade Maritime News)
The shipping industry needs to ensure that seafarers are among the essential workers that are first in line to receive a Covid-19 vaccine, say leading representatives. With a number of vaccine trials now showing promising rates of success, the need for seafarers to be treated as essential workers and be among the first to receive vaccinations, was highlighted by speakers at the CrewConnect Global 2020 Virtual Event, organised by Informa Connect. Stephen Cotton, general secretary of International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) said, “I think all the work we’ve done in lobbying governments now needs to be even more concerted effort about the point that seafarers are essential workers…  FULL STORY

CYBER ATTACKS ON THE RISE IN SHIPPING
Source: Shirish Nadkarni (Seatrade Maritime News)
Shipping is seeing a rise in cyber attacks as the industry digitalises, a process that has been accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic. “Cyber attacks in shipping have been steadily on the rise of late, and safety in shipping today depends heavily on cyber systems with potential consequences towards both finance and safety,” Wu Shengwei, head of section for shipping and technical advisory, maritime advisory SEAOI Region, for DNV GL told delegates of the Inmex SMM Virtual Expo, last Friday. “There are threats in the field of information technology, like IT networks, e-mail, electronic manuals and certificates, planned maintenance, permits to work, spares management and requisitioning, administration, accounts, crew lists, etc, where mainly finance and reputation are at risk.  FULL STORY

MORE THAN 60 AUSTRALIAN COAL-CARRYING SHIPS KEPT WAITING TO UNLOAD OFF PORTS IN CHINA
Source: The Guardian
More than 60 ships carrying Australian coal have been stranded at sea – some for months – while waiting to enter Chinese ports, according to analysts, with the Morrison government being urged to clarify the long delays. Dozens of vessels are being kept waiting, according to the global commodity and energy price reporting agency Argus, which has been tracking the situation. An Argus representative told Guardian Australia some of those vessels left Australia as long ago as May and many had been waiting in Chinese waters since September.  FULL STORY

RIGHTSHIP ANNOUNCES INNOVATIVE MARITIME EMISSIONS PORTAL
Source: International Shipping News (Hellenic Shipping News)
After winning a coveted Google Impact Challenge Grant, RightShip has worked with the Pilbara Ports Authority to develop a successful pilot program that allows ports around the world to review their emissions profiles and develop appropriate management strategies. London; 24 November 2020: After partnering with The Australian Marine Environment Protection Association (AUSMEPA), and winning a $250,000 Google Impact grant in 2016, RightShip and AUSMEPA have successfully developed a Maritime Emissions Portal (MEP), which will provide leading emissions inventory data to ports around the world.  FULL STORY

PORTS MUST BE MADE SHIPSHAPE: INDUSTRY
Source: Colin Brinsden (Australian Associated Press)
Governments are being urged to investigate what is needed to keep the nation's ports competitive and ensure they are being operated for the public benefit. In a discussion paper, the Australian Industry Group says despite the nation's dependence on ports, Australia followed many other countries by privatising them to fund other infrastructure projects and reduce debt. The group's chief executive Innes Willox believes privatisation has brought risks, such as the undervaluation of port assets, increasing port charges, competition issues and less port investment.  FULL STORY

BULK BUYS: IRON ORE DEMAND STILL CANTERING AHEAD OF SUPPLY, COKING COAL PRICES WOBBLE
Source: Mike Cooper (Stockhead)
Iron ore demand is still rising with prices trading closer to the magic $US130 per tonne this week as steel mills again increased their profit margins. Spot prices have advanced to $US126.80 per tonne ($173.85/t), and shadowing a move up in steel product prices. A week ago, iron ore cargoes delivered to ports in China were trading around $US124 per tonne, Metal Bulletin said. “Steel mill margins remain supported by robust steel demand in China’s infrastructure and manufacturing sectors,” said commodity analyst Vivek Dhar at Commonwealth Bank of Australia in a report.  FULL STORY

MINRES EYES 92MN T/YR AUSTRALIAN IRON ORE EXPORTS
Source: Jo Clarke (Argus Media)
Australian mining firm Mineral Resources (MinRes) plans to ramp up its iron ore export capacity in Western Australia (WA) to 92mn t/yr over the next 3-5 years, from a target of 19.5mn-21.2mn in the 2020-21 fiscal year to 30 June. It aims to achieve this by increasing sales from the Yilgarn region of WA, where it operates the Koolyanobbing mine, to 13mn t/yr from the 8mn t/yr it achieved in July-September. It will also increase production at its existing Pilbara hub that is centred on its Iron Valley mine to 14mn t/yr from 7.5mn-8.5mn t/yr. It will add a further 25mn t/yr through trans-shipping ore from the Pilbara town of Onslow and is negotiating with the WA government to build two new terminals at Port Hedland…   FULL STORY

ELIWANA, IRON BRIDGE TO MAINTAIN FORTESCUE’S LOW-COST STATUS
Source: Salomae Haselgrove (Australian Mining)
Fortescue Metals Group is aiming to set itself apart from other major Australian iron ore producers with its integrated product strategy, targeting higher grade material. Chief operating officer Greg Lilleyman outlined this approach at IMARC 2020, highlighting the company’s plan to complete infrastructure blending at Port Hedland. By doing so, Fortescue will be able to blend premium, high-grade iron product with lower-grade ores across its product range, maximising value for the company.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIAN MARITIME AND FISHERIES ACADEMY USING ONLINE COURSE DELIVERY
Source: Jarrad Delaney (Port Lincoln Times)
The Australian Maritime and Fisheries Academy has responded to the needs of students and industry during COVID-19 and is offering blended learning with online elements. The academy, which has campuses in Port Lincoln and Port Adelaide, will use its technology to deliver all courses online, using a blended learning model where all course work is computer based but incorporating face-to-face components where needed.
Academy chief executive officer Bob Miller said staying in touch with people in Port Lincoln revealed a fishing industry suffering through COVID-19.  FULL STORY

OOCL, VICT SET NEW BENCHMARK FOR HIGHEST CONTAINER EXCHANGE IN AUSTRALIA
Source: Port News (Hellenic Shipping News)
The OOCL Rotterdam (capable of accommodating 8,063 TEUs, 323m LOA and 42.8m BEAM) on the North East Asia A3 Central Service has set a new record within the Port of Melbourne and Australia for the highest container exchange in one single call – a total of 6,516 containers equating to 11,037 TEUs. The vessel called at Australia’s first fully automated container terminal, Victoria International Container Terminal (VICT), last November 20 and completed the record exchange in 90 hours with 72.4 berth moves per hour.  FULL STORY

PORT OF NEWCASTLE BACK IN THE GRAIN EXPORT GAME
Source: Gregor Heard (Farm Weekly)
AFTER a tough couple of years where most of the grain going through the Port of Newcastle was being imported to satisfy upcountry end users that could not source local supplies, the northern NSW port is back in the export game. Officials from the Port of Newcastle said the facility was set to export its first major volumes of grain since 2018, with the first shipment leaving the port on Monday afternoon. The departure of bulk carrier Ince Point loaded at the Newcastle Agri Terminal (NAT) and carrying 35,000 tonnes of wheat, destined for the Vietnamese port of Cai Mep, near Ho Chi Minh City…  FULL STORY

SANTOS RECEIVES AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT APPROVAL FOR GIANT NARRABRI GAS PROJECT
Source: Nathan Richardson (S&P Global)
Sydney — Australian LNG exporter Santos has received key federal government environmental approval for its giant onshore Narrabri gas project, which has the potential to free up more supply for export via the company's Gladstone LNG facility. The environmental approval paves the way for Santos to begin a 12-18 month appraisal program on the coal seam gas project, which will precede a final investment decision, Santos said Nov. 24. Santos CEO Kevin Gallagher said the conditions of the approval were consistent with those given by the state of New South Wales' Independent Planning Commission on Sept. 30 and "generally in line with those for our GLNG operations".  FULL STORY

FREIGHT CONGESTION PUSHING UP PRICES AND COSTING COMPANIES
Source: Catherine Harris (Stuff)
Congestion at ports and a lack of space on planes and container ships is starting to hit exporters, manufacturers and consumers in the pocket. Global supply chains have been sluggish since Covid-19, delaying imports. And while export figures have been holding up well, growers say the difficulty and cost of getting a spot on air or sea transport is becoming onerous, just as the export season takes off. Dieter Adam, the chief executive of the Manufacturers and Exporters Association, said his members were having a hard time getting products in or out of the country.  FULL STORY

TESTING THE WATERS
Source: Stephen Scourfield (The West Australian)
What happens now?
In 2020, we are facing the cautious start of interstate travel, with all the faltering moments that will keep us sensible, though not scared. For 2021, the cruising industry is edging towards a careful, gradual restart, first in regional waters. After Australia, in December but mainly next year, will come New Zealand, with Auckland potentially as a pivotal port. This is being revealed as a phased, measured resumption of cruising with strict COVID-19 protocols. It will begin in Australia with locally flagged then home-ported vessels sailing Australian and then New Zealand and South Pacific waters.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability