News & Media

14 May, 2021

Australian Newsletter - Issue 678

MARITIME COMPANIES TO DEVELOP CO2 CARRIER DESIGN
Source: Gary Howard (Seatrade Maritime News)
ABS, Hyundai Mipo Dockyard (HMD), Korea Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (KSOE), and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Maritime Administrator have signed an agreement to develop liquefied CO2 carrier ship designs. With carbon capture and storage (CCS) expected to play a role in the world’s ambition to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, storage and transportation of CO2—a GHG—is expected to be essential in reaching carbon emission reduction targets. “Development of these next generation CO2 carrier designs will speed the adoption of CCS technology and facilitate net negative emissions strategies.  FULL STORY

PORT CITIES ARE KEY TO REDUCING MARITIME CARBON EMISSIONS
Source: Paul Isbell and Bart Édes (Green Biz)
Port cities offer a vital — and overlooked — way to help decarbonize the global economy.
The maritime sector has been seen as a laggard in decarbonizing, but port cities are perfectly positioned to help catalyze a reduction in shipping emissions. Over half of all maritime emissions come from ships while berthed in ports. A port can provide clean renewable energy to ships in port — as well as to the city and  surrounding industrial clusters — and support vessels can provide clean electricity to ships on the approach to the port. Port cities also can provide the infrastructure needed to facilitate a switch from fuel oil to liquefied natural gas for ships, apply "green port duties" and fee incentives to speed adoption of clean shipping, invest in hydrogen, biogas and carbon capture and ...  FULL STORY

RISING ROLLOVER RATES SHOW WORSENING MARITIME SUPPLY CHAIN DELAYS
Source: Supply Chain Management Review
Last month’s rollover rates published by project44, the global leader in advanced visibility for shippers and logistics service providers, indicate that maritime supply chain woes are worsening, with little indication that carriers are addressing the industry’s serious capacity issues. Data from ports across the world collected by project44 shows that the percentage of containers missing their scheduled sailing is still rising, with some major carriers and ports posting rollover rates over 50% for the month of April. While the average rollover rate for April across all surveyed ports and carriers was 39%, individual ports that account for a significant portion of maritime cargo posted even worse results.  FULL STORY

LNG AS FUEL GATHERS SPEED, BUT OLDER VESSELS FACE BUMPS IN THE ROAD
Source: Paul Bartlett (Seatrade Maritime News)
Some 18.5% of newbuildings contracted in the first four months of 2021 are designed to operate on LNG as fuel according to classification society DNV. However, many older vessels are unlikely to meet new IMO carbon intensity requirements likely to be adopted at MEPC 76 in June and due to enter force in January 2023. Even a new ship, delivered in 2022, will need several upgrades over its lifetime to keep abreast of tightening IMO carbon regulations in the years ahead. These were amongst the conclusions drawn by Christos Chryssakis, DNV Maritime’s Business Development Manager, at a webinar earlier this week… FULL STORY

MARITIME COMPANIES COMMITTED TO NURTURING YOUNG TALENTS DESPITE COVID-19 CHALLENGES
Source: Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore
21 maritime companies will host 30 undergraduates from local institutes of higher learning under the 12-week Global Internship Award (GIA)[1] from May to July 2021. Established by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), the GIA programme offers high-achieving undergraduates internships at global maritime companies based in Singapore. These undergraduates can acquire valuable industry experience that will prepare them for careers in the maritime sector.  FULL STORY

CAPESIZE MARKET SLIPS AS CHARTERERS TAKE A BREATH
Source: Nidaa Bakhsh (Lloyd’s List)
Miners and charterers are said to be taking a breather following a rally that reached record levels last week. A change in sentiment is creeping into the market, analysts say, even as iron ore futures move up to a record-breaking $230 per tonne. The volatile capesize market has fallen 12% this week as miners and charterers paused for breath following a rally to more than $44,000 per day. The average weighted time charter slid to $37,724 per day at the close on May 13 on the Baltic Exchange from $42,370 at the start of the week.The rally up to almost $45,000 on May 5, the highest for the assessment that began in 2014 encompassing five key trading routes on a 180,000 dwt vessel, had been interrupted by concerns that souring relations between China and Australia after trade talks failed could impact iron ore supplies.  FULL STORY 

PILBARA PORTS AUTHORITY RELEASES APRIL FIGURES
Source: Lydia Woellwarth (Dry Bulk Magazine)
Pilbara Ports Authority has delivered a total monthly throughput of 60.6 million t for April 2021. This throughput was a 2% decrease compared to the same month in 2020. The Port of Port Hedland achieved a monthly throughput of 45.8 million t of which 45.1 million t was iron ore exports. This was the same monthly throughput reported in March 2020. Imports through the Port of Port Hedland totalled 186 000 t, an increase of 29% from the same month in 2020.  FULL STORY

FEDERAL SUPPORT TO HELP TURN THE PILBARA’S BURRUP PENINSULA INTO THE “SILICON VALLEY” OF HYDROGEN
Source: Peter Long (The West Australian)
We were ecstatic to hear last week that the Australian Renewable Energy Agency — ARENA — had chosen Yara Pilbara and Engie Renewables Australia Pty Ltd to receive $42.4 million funding for their renewable hydrogen project on the Burrup Peninsular. This project will construct a 10 megawatt solar power station and electrolysers to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen produced will then be combined with atmospheric nitrogen to make renewable ammonia for export to the world out of the Port of Dampier.  FULL STORY  

THERE’S A NEW PLAN TO UNLOCK A MAGNETITE MINING HUB IN WA’S MID-WEST
Source: Reuben Adams (Stockhead)
For almost 50 years, attempts to ‘unlock’ WA’s Mid-West magnetite iron ore province have failed.
Distance from port, and a lack of supply of water and energy made costs prohibitive for aspiring miners. The magnetite operations that did manage to get up and running generally performed poorly. (There are two main types of iron ores – hematite and magnetite. Hematite is a higher grade in the ground, while magnetite deposits are large and quite low grade – but produce super high-grade products.) Most recently, plans for a ~$10 billion rail system and deep water port called ‘Oakajee’ near Geraldton proved unviable as soon as iron ore prices retreated from their 2011 peaks.  FULL STORY 

WA GOVERNMENT TO KILL PERTH FREIGHT LINK
Source: AAP Newswire
Western Australia's government will block future construction of the Perth Freight Link despite $1.2 billion in federal funding remaining on the table. Transport Minister Rita Saffioti will on Wednesday introduce legislation rezoning the Beeliar Wetlands to stop future road development. It will effectively kill off the controversial Roe 8 and 9 project, which was first proposed by the former WA Liberal government in 2014 and would have cut through a large portion of the environmentally significant wetlands on the way to Fremantle Harbour. Voters effectively rejected the proposal by electing a Labor government in 2017 and expanding the party's majority at this year's election.  FULL STORY

TANKER FACES INSPECTION AFTER SHIP-JUMPING SAILOR RESCUED FROM BUOY
Source: Simone Fox Koob and Racheal Dexter (The Age)
A sailor who jumped from an international oil tanker and was found clinging to a buoy five kilometres from shore in Port Phillip Bay has been placed in hotel quarantine, as authorities prepare to inspect the ship. The 31-year-old Georgian national was rescued by water police about 8pm on Sunday after they were told by harbour control that he was holding onto a navigational marker. Aerial footage of the buoy in Port Phillip Bay where the sailor was found. He was pulled from the water and taken to Williamstown where he was medically assessed.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIAN-FIRST COVID VACCINATIONS FOR FOREIGN SEAFARERS IN PORT BOTANY MUST BE EXTENDED NATIONALLY
Source: MirageNews.com
In an Australian-first, NSW Health will provide COVID-19 vaccinations to a small number of foreign seafarers onboard vessels that transport gas between Australian ports in an effort to reduce the risk of the virus entering the community. The Maritime Union of Australia welcomed the initiative between NSW Health and NSW Ports, which will cover vessels that regularly visit the Port Botany Bulk Liquids Berth but said the model must be rolled out nationally to reduce the risk of COVID transmission to waterfront workers. Sixteen seafarers onboard Singapore-flagged LPG carrier Epic St Agnes, which is on long-term charter to...  FULL STORY

TNS LOGISTICS MOVES TO PORT OF BRISBANE
Source: TrailerMag.com.au
Family-owned integrated logistics provider, TNS Logistics has signed a 10-year lease with the Port of Brisbane. The agreement is for a 1.56ha site within the Port Gate Estate and will include a new 2,000sqm warehouse and corporate office. In addition to this the site incorporates a wash bay and 7,617sqm dedicated hardstand; truck and trailer storage and onsite staff car parking. It will also utilise an existing 1,075sqm warehouse to meet TNS Logistics’ specific requirements. In keeping with Port of Brisbane sustainable design standards, the development will be designed to 5 star Green Star equivalent which will include a 100kW rooftop solar system, rainwater harvesting tanks, irrigated landscaping, and LED lighting amongst other ESD initiatives.  FULL STORY

NZ FAST TRACK EXPANSION DENIED
Source: PortStrategy.com
A fast-track application for a NZ$68.5m expansion project at a New Zealand port has been rejected.
The Port of Tauranga’s application for the Covid-19 recovery fast-track resource consenting process for its proposed berth extension at the Tauranga Container Terminal has been rejected according to the New Zealand Herald. Tauranga is seeking consent for an additional berth to help alleviate Upper North Island supply chain congestion. The port has been handling diverted cargo from Auckland, which has suffered from congestion issues since September, while Ports of Auckland continues to face an uncertain future, however it has limited capacity.  FULL STORY 

REFUELLING VESSEL TO BERTH IN TAURANGA
Source: Sunlive.co.nz
Tauranga’s seaport is the new home of a ship-refuelling vessel that will play a significant role in refuelling large vessels operating in the Bay of Plenty region. The new 65-metre state-of-the-art ‘bunkering’ barge, MT Korimako will help to increase the efficiency of filling operations at Port of Tauranga for Mobil Oil New Zealand Limited marine fuels customers. Arriving from Australia, where it has been in operation since it was commissioned, the Korimako, previously named the Anatoma, has been re-flagged to New Zealand, and commenced servicing vessels in Tauranga Moana last Wednesday.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability.