News & Media

11 June, 2021

Australian Newsletter - Issue 682

GLOBAL MARITIME FREIGHT TRANSPORT MARKET (2021 TO 2026) - GROWTH, TRENDS, COVID-19 IMPACT AND FORECASTS
Source: Global News Wire
The global maritime freight transport segment is expected to exhibit a growth of about 4% during the forecast period. The traditional port world is changing as the demographical, technological, and sustainability drivers are affecting the daily business and shaping several important trends. The global shipping industry is expected to face a number of challenges including geopolitical uncertainties, such as the US-China trade negotiations and Brexit. China has a strong influence on the shipping sector since it is a major trade partner for several countries. Although, the container shipping market in China is facing some early year disruption due to COVID-19.  FULL STORY

YOUR CLIMATE CHANGE GOALS MAY HAVE A MARITIME SHIPPING PROBLEM
Source: Platts
The international cargo and container shipping industry plays a central role in global supply chains, but until recently has made few inroads toward decarbonization. That needs to change if the world is going to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. Maritime shipping is one of the few sectors left out of the language of the Paris Agreement on climate change. The industry currently accounts for a relatively small share of global CO2 emissions — between 2% and 3% according to S&P Global Platts Analytics — but some scientists have projected that maritime shipping could account for 17% of total annual CO2 emissions by 2050.  FULL STORY

EUROPE’S FIRST MARITIME OPERATIONS AND TRAINING CENTRE FOR ROBOTIC VEHICLES WILL FUTURE-PROOF TRAINING FOR CIVILIAN AND MILITARY VESSEL OPERATIONS
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
Three key players involved in the drive to autonomous ship operations have joined forces to create Europe’s first training and development centre, dedicated to supporting maritime’s digital transition. The Royal Navy, SeaBot XR, and the United Kingdom’s National Oceanography Centre (NOC), all active members of the Solent Maritime Enterprise Zone (MEZ), signed on 19 May a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to create the National Centre for Operational Excellence in Marine Robotics based in Southampton, UK.  FULL STORY

MARITIME’S SCANT R&D SPEND HIGHLIGHTED AHEAD OF TOMORROW’S MEPC GATHERING
Source: Sam Chambers (Splash247.com)
Ahead of tomorrow’s start of the Marine Environment Protection Committee gathering at the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has tapped data from the International Energy Agency (IEA) to hammer home its repeated demands for a decarbonisation research and development fund. Maritime spending on R&D is paltry compared to other industries, data from the IEA shows starkly. Maritime’s R&D spending between 2007 to 2019 remained stagnant. R&D in the automotive sector, any contrast, has increased from $67bn in 2009 to a $130bn in 2019, the IEA data shows.  FULL STORY

SLOW PROCESSING IN CHINESE PORTS SEES OVERSUPPLY OF CITRUS IN AUSTRALIAN MARKETS
Source: Joanna Prendergast (ABC News)
One of Western Australia's largest citrus producers says it has been unable to send its fruit to China due to hold-ups at Chinese ports. Dandaragan-based AGRIFresh director Daniel Ying said domestic prices were down on last year with the WA market was awash with fruit from the eastern states. "This season, I think, with a lot of international pressures – especially with the relationship between China and Australia – has put a lot of pressure on the domestic market," he said. "We're not seeing a lot of containers exported to China this year compared to previous years.  FULL STORY 

MARITIME WORKER SUSPECTED OF BEING A COVID ‘SHEDDER’ PUT BACK INTO QUARANTINE IN PERTH
Source: Marta Pascual Jaunola (WA Today)
Testing by West Australian health authorities is under way to determine whether a maritime worker who returned a positive result for COVID-19 after leaving hotel quarantine was infectious in the community. The worker travelled to Perth on a flight from Colombia via the United States in May and was placed into hotel quarantine on arrival, where he returned a negative result on day 13. He was released from the Pan Pacific Hotel into the community on Friday but forced back into hotel quarantine less than 24 hours later after he returned a “moderately strong” positive PCR test he took for work.  FULL STORY

BULK BUYS: DOES CHINESE TRADE DATA SIGNAL THE END FOR IRON ORE PARTY?
Source: Josh Chiat (Stockhead)
Analysts have signalled notes of caution over Chinese trade data from May, which fell amid a backdrop of CCP fury about sky-high commodity prices and the sheer volume of cash they’ve been sending Australia’s way in the midst of a sort of trade war. Imports of iron ore into China slowed by 8.9% in May to 89.7 million tonnes. That was a fall from more than 98Mt in April and 102Mt in March, with high prices and the crimping of the local steel sector said to be to blame. Not too much of a concern immediately for prices though…  FULL STORY

PORT WOES PERSIST FOR WEST AUSTRALIAN IRON ORE EXPORTS
Source: Argus Media
Port issues for Australian iron ore producers Rio Tinto and BHP continued to weigh on shipments from the four largest producers in the Pilbara region of Western Australia (WA) in the week to 5 June. The four largest WA producers — Rio Tinto, BHP, Fortescue Metals and Roy Hill — loaded vessels with a combined 16.57mn deadweight tonnes (dwt) of capacity in the latest week, down from 17.09mn dwt in the week ending 29 May. Loadings were 5pc below the average of 17.25mn dwt/week over the past year, with Rio Tinto not shipping anything from its East Intercourse Island (EII) berths at Dampier for the second week in a row and BHP experiencing issues at its Finucane Island terminal at Port Hedland.  FULL STORY

GWR ON TRACK FOR MILLION-TONNE MILESTONE
Source: Nickolas Zakharia (Australian Mining)
GWR Group has embarked on its goal to ship one million tonnes of iron ore by December 2021. The company completed its fourth shipment of iron ore from the C4 operation, part of the Wiluna West project in Western Australia on May 16, which included 52,990 wet metric tonnes of iron ore. In April, the miner suffered shipment setbacks due to impacts from cyclone Seroja on port activity. However, GWR is now on track to ship two vessels, with the first to set sail between June 8 and 10 and the second likely to embark between June 22 and 26. From June, GWG has anticipated it will begin to ship twice a month, which will allow it to export one million tonnes by December 2021, which is part of the company’s stage one production target at the C4 deposit. GWR ships its iron ore from the Port of Geraldton in Western Australia.  FULL STORY  

GRAIN IMPORT PROGRAM QUIETLY DRAWS TO A CLOSE
Source: Gregor Heard (Queensland Country Life)
WHILE for most grain industry participants the grain import program of 2019 feels a distant memory, for those managing the stringent import protocols the scheme has just drawn to a close. The federal government Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment (DAWE) permitted Manildra to import wheat from Canada for use in its Nowra gluten manufacturing plant due to a lack of suitable domestic supply. However, in order to protect Australian grain growers from a range of potential biosecurity incursions there were very strict conditions placed on potential grain imports as part of the DAWE bulk grain import program.  FULL STORY

PORT OF NEWCASTLE SEES SUSTAINABILITY SUCCESS
Source: Imogen Hartman (Infrastructure Magazine)
In its recently released annual report measuring sustainability progress, Port of Newcastle has seen success in terms of its environmental, interpersonal, economical and trade targets. Port of Newcastle’s CEO, Craig Carmody, said the 2020 Sustainability Report examined the Port’s efforts to embed the principles of sustainability across its operations. “In a year that was defined by the COVID-19 pandemic, Port of Newcastle continued to pursue a diverse range of initiatives to create sustainable social, environmental and economic benefits for the Hunter and NSW,” Mr Carmody said. “I am especially proud to see the Port’s new fleet of electric vehicles on the road and the establishment of our first Indigenous STEM Scholarship in partnership with the University of Newcastle.  FULL STORY

AURIZON HAS RE-OPENS ITS DEPOT TO HAUL EXPORT GRAIN FROM THALLON
Source: Helen Walker (Queensland Country Life)
After several tough years in the Thallon district, bulk commodity mover Aurizon has re-opened its depot to haul export grain to the Port of Brisbane for independent grain producer Thallon Grains. The first trains left in early May and it is estimated Aurizon will move more than 50,000 tonnes of the high-quality grain grown in the district by rail to the Port of Brisbane over the next three months. The trains are loaded from grower-owned storage that sits adjacent to the railway at Thallon, together with the nearby GrainCorp loading facility. "Queensland growers have enjoyed a bumper harvest and we're delighted to be able to partner with Thallon Grains to meet their supply chain needs….  FULL STORY

AUCKLAND AUSSIE BEER FESTIVAL DEFERRED DUE TO SHIPPING DELAYS
Source: Sophie Trigger (NZ Herald)
The organisers of a craft beer festival in Auckland say heavy congestion at New Zealand ports and shipping delays of up to five weeks have forced its postponement. After cancelling their 2020 festival due to Covid-19, GABS (Great Australian Beer Spectacular) was scheduled to return to Auckland on July 3. GABS Managing Director Mike Bray said they were gutted to be deferring the Auckland festival for a second time. "We've got 200 kegs of festival beer all ready and good to go, all for New Zealand, so we've got to try and find a date very quickly and that's not too easy at the moment," he said.  FULL STORY 

EXPORT DELAYS CAUSING NEW ZEALAND PRODUCE TO LANGUISH ON SHELVES, IN COLD STORES
Source: Demelza Leslie (News Hub)
Some of the country's growers and exporters are worried their produce will be wasted because of continued shipping delays. Vessels are behind schedule and in some cases skipping New Zealand ports - meaning produce is stuck in warehouses and unable to get to market. Seafood destined for overseas restaurants is languishing on the shelf in Nelson. Doug Paulin from Sealord New Zealand says it's problematic. "We, like a number of exporters, are having issues getting our frozen products off our boats and into cold stores and out of New Zealand."  FULL STORY

HAWKE'S BAY COOL STORES FILLED WITH FRUIT AS EXPORTERS STRUGGLE TO GET IT SHIPPED
Source: NZ Herald
As New Zealand's supply chain to the rest of the world remains critically constrained, Hawke's Bay growers are concerned over produce getting to market. Exporters are no longer able to make forward freight bookings between Australia and New Zealand as international shipping companies are abandoning the relatively remote and marginal trans-Tasman routes, choosing the profitable routes between China, Europe and the United States instead.  FULL STORY 

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability.