News & Media

30 July, 2021

Australian Newsletter - Issue 689

SHIPPING GROUP WARN OF ‘SERIOUS SHORTAGE’ OF SEAFARERES BY 2026
Source: ShipandBunker.com
Shipping groups are warning that the industry may be facing a ‘serious shortage’ of seafarers in as little as five years from now. Industry groups BIMCO and the International Chamber of Shipping made the warning in their new Seafarer Workforce Report, published on Wednesday. “The industry must significantly increase training and recruitment levels if it is to avoid a serious shortage in the total supply of officers by 2026,” the organisations said in an emailed statement on Wednesday. Given the growing demand for STCW certified officers, the report predicts that there will be a need for an additional 89,510 officers by 2026 to operate the world merchant fleet. FULL STORY  

SINGAPORE LAUNCHES MARITIME DECARBONISATION CENTRE
Source: Adis Ajdin (Splash247.com)
The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) has announced the formation of the Global Centre for Maritime Decarbonisation (GCMD) in Singapore and appointed Lynn Loo as its chief executive officer. Established with around $90m fund from MPA and six founding partners, BHP, BW Group, Eastern Pacific Shipping, Foundation Det Norske Veritas, Ocean Network Express and Sembcorp Marine, the centre aims to spearhead the maritime industry’s energy transition journey. “The GCMD will collaborate with the industry to help reduce shipping’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, implement identified decarbonisation pathways and create new business opportunities,” MPA said. FULL STORY

GLOBAL CONTAINER PORT CAPACITY WILL STRUGGLE TO CATCH UP WITH RISING DEMAND
Source: Mike Wackett (TheLoadStar.com)
The bleak outlook of significantly lower throughput levels for container hub ports at the outset of the pandemic has now transformed into an acute capacity shortage at terminals around the world. Ocean carriers have to juggle their networks to navigate around highly congested container ports, especially in North Europe and on the US west coast, resulting in an escalation of supply chain uncertainty. In today’s HMM terminal status update, the South Korean carrier reports serious delays and congestion for vessel berthing and yard and gate issues at the majority of its port calls. Similar problems are being faced by HMM’s peers: The Loadstar was told by a carrier contact last week that line schedules were a “complete mess” and at their “worst state of disruption” in recent memory.  FULL STORY

CALL FOR RISK-BASED MEASURES TO PREVENT CARGO PEST CONTAMINATION
Source: Seatrade-maritime.com
The call by the five partners of the Cargo Integrity Group (CIG) follows moves by pest control experts under the auspices of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), to take all-encompassing, internationally imposed steps to mitigate pest contamination risks. One potential measure which is being seriously considered according to CIG is mandatory certification of cleanliness for all containers prior to loading on board a ship. The members warned this would have a significant impact on global trade in terms of time and cost. Lars Kjaer, Senior Vice President of the World Shipping Council (WSC), explained the CIG partners concerns around the proposals: “We know that more serious risks occur among certain types of goods and from identified regions.”  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIA’S STANMORE TO RAMP UP COAL OUTPUT
Source: ArgusMedia.com
Australian mining firm Stanmore Coal expects to ramp coal production back up to a rate of at least 2.4mn t/yr during July-December, after cutting sales in April-June to just 293,000t. Stanmore plans to start building its A$82mn Isaac Downs semi-soft coking and thermal coal extension to its Isaac Plains mine next month, giving it access to more economic coal and extending the life of the operation by at least 10 years at a maximum operating rate of 2.5mn t/yr. It will use the ramp up of this extension, combined with increased output from its existing operations, to ramp back up to at least 2.4mn t/yr over the second half of calendar 2021. FULL STORY

ACCC APPEALS LOSS OF NSW PORTS COURT CASE
Source: Jenny Wiggins (AFR.com.au)
The competition watchdog has appealed the loss of a court case against Port Botany’s owners, claiming that the Federal Court erred when it ruled that a privatisation agreement that allowed the continuation of a monopoly business was not anti-competitive. “Here you have a government monopoly being privatised,” Australian Competition & Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims told The Australian Financial Review. “The aim was to maximise the profit from the sale by protecting that monopoly from competition. The judge didn’t think that was anti-competitive and we do.” The ACCC is appealing both the purpose and the effect of deeds linked to the NSW government’s $5.1 billion sale of Port Botany and Port Kembla to the NSW Ports consortium. FULL STORY

PORT OF NEWCASTLE RECEIVES NEW MOBILE HARBOUR CRANES
Source: April Shepherd (InfrastructureMagazine.com.au)
Port of Newcastle will receive a $28.4-million investment in two LHM 550 mobile harbour cranes, plus associated infrastructure, at the Port’s Mayfield 4 berth. The contract to supply the cranes has been awarded to German company, Liebherr, with the mobile harbour cranes enhancing the Port’s project cargo, general cargo and container handling capacity. Port of Newcastle’s Executive Manager Trade & Business Development, Paul Brown, said the mobile harbour cranes will increase efficiency at the Port and provide an enhanced alternative for customers currently moving both oversized equipment and containerised cargoes through the East Coast’s capital city ports.  FULL STORY

ACCC APPEAL LIFTS HOPES FOR NEWCASTLE CONTAINER PORT
Source: GrainCentral.com
THE Australian Competition & Consumer Commission (ACCC) has lodged an appeal in response to the Federal Court decision which dismissed the ACCC’s proceedings against NSW Ports. The Federal Court decision was a setback for plans by Mayfield Development Corporation (MDC) to build a container terminal at the Port of Newcastle (PON). In principle, the planned terminal is being supported by exporters of grain, pulses, cotton and meat produced in northern and central New South Wales who regularly encounter logistics issues when shipping out of Sydney’s Port Botany. FULL STORY

TOWNSVILLE PORT’S $232 MILLION UPGRADE ROCKS ON
Source: Statements.QLD.gov.au
The largest infrastructure project in the Port of Townsville’s history has reached a major milestone with the completion of the $232 million Channel Upgrade project’s rock wall. Constructing the 2.2-kilometre rock wall is the first critical step in widening Townsville’s shipping channel to allow larger ships to access the Port instead of bypassing Townsville. The material recovered as the dredging team starts to widen almost 15 kilometres of sea channels over the next two years will be used to reclaim the area behind the wall and support a 62-hectare expansion. Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, said the channel upgrade was a key project under the Townsville City Deal.  FULL STORY

GEELONG AT THE HELM OF STATE’S PORTS
Source: Keith Platt (MPNews.com.au)
THE centre of control for Victoria’s commercial ports, including Hastings, has moved from Melbourne to Geelong. The Port of Hastings’ harbourmaster Captain Shane Vedamuttu will remain based at Crib Point. The newly-formed Ports Victoria combines the Victorian Regional Channels Authority (VRCA) and Victorian Ports Corporation (Melbourne) and will control the strategic management and operation of the state’s commercial ports and waterways. The change follows an independent review of the ports system which included 60 recommendations and was handed to the state government in November 2020. FULL STORY

THREE CREW MEMBERS TO BE REMOVED FROM SUSPECTED COVID SHIP AT FREMANTLE PORT IN PERTH
Source: Rhiannon Shine and Lucy Martin (ABC.net.au)
Three crew members suspected of having COVID-19 have been medically evacuated from a ship berthed at Fremantle Port in Western Australia. The three crew fell ill on the bulk carrier MV Darya Krishna while at sea. They were taken to Fiona Stanley Hospital by a St John Ambulance COVID-dedicated vehicle and special operations crew to Fiona Stanley Hospital. The remaining 17 crew members on board will be tested for COVID-19. Speaking earlier, WA Premier Mark McGowan said eight crew members onboard the Darya Krishna had reported flu-like symptoms and described the vessel's second officer as being "very unwell". FULL STORY

WA LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY WARNS A BAN ON CARGO SHIPS FROM INDONESIA COULD HAVE DISASTROUS CONSEQUENCES
Source: Courtney Fowler (ABC.net.au)
The Australian Livestock Export Council (ALEC) has urged the West Australian government to reconsider any plans to turn back cargo vessels travelling from Indonesia. The comments came after Premier Mark McGowan expressed concerns about an infection control breach that saw two unvaccinated health workers put into hotel quarantine following the transfer of three "critically ill" infected crew members off a ship berthed at Fremantle. Six more seafarers have since tested positive on board the MV Darya Krishna — the fourth merchant ship to arrive in WA waters with infected crew after making stops in Indonesia this month. FULL STORY

AUSTRALIA'S LITHIUM MINERS POWERING THE GLOBAL ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGE
Source: Rachel Pupazzoni (ABC.net.au)
Australian miners are in the driver's seat to take advantage of the surge in demand for electric vehicles. Australia is the world's biggest producer and exporter of lithium, a key component in batteries. It is particularly favoured by electric vehicle (EV) manufacturers because it is lightweight. With the biggest car maker in the world, Volkswagen, committing to half its cars being electric by 2030, demand for lithium is set to continue soaring. "The EV demand growth this year has been really strong," Hayden Bairstow, division director of resources equity research at Macquarie Capital, said. FULL STORY

NZ IMPORTING RECORD AMOUNT OF COAL
Source: OTD.co.nz
New Zealand is likely to import more coal this year than it has in any other year, in the midst of a government-declared climate emergency. Last year the country's main coal users imported more than they had in 14 years, and this year government officials expect even more to come in. Most of this coal is burned to power our homes and businesses. The government expects an additional 150,000 tonnes of coal will arrive here, a 14 percent increase on last year's total which was already over 1 million tonnes. Forest and Bird chief executive Kevin Hague said this was unacceptable. "What we're seeing is the result of years of failure to put in place alternative arrangements. And in consequence, we're faced with this disaster," FULL STORY

DELTA CASES RISE ON CONTAINERSHIP IN NEW ZEALAND
Source: Mike Schuler (GCaptain.com)
New Zealand health officials have confirmed additional cases of COVID-19 on board the containership Mattina, bringing the total number of confirmed cases on the ship to 15. Officials perviously reported that the cases are linked to the more transmissible Delta variant. The MV Mattina arrived at the Port of Bluff last Sunday, July 18, with two crew members showing symptoms of COVID-19. Testing of all 21 crew members have confirmed more cases. All crew who have tested positive for the virus will remain in quarantine on board the vessel, where they will maintain the minimum functions of the ship and will not have direct contact with any port staff. FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability.