News & Media

11 September, 2020

Australian Newsletter - Issue 643

COVID-19: SHIPPING DATA HINTS TO SOME RECOVERY IN GLOBAL TRADE
Source: Hellenic Shipping News
The coronavirus pandemic dealt a severe blow to global merchandise trade. Data from weekly port calls by container ships show early but uneven signs of recovery. The number of ships pulling into ports to unload and load containers rebounded in many parts of the world in the third quarter of 2020, according to new UNCTAD calculations. This offers a hopeful sign for world merchandise trade, which suffered a historic year-on-year fall of 27% in the second quarter.  FULL STORY

IMO SEC-GEN CALL FOR ACTION ON CREW CHANGE CRISIS AHEAD OF UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Source: Seatrade Maritime News
IMO secretary-general Kitack Lim has repeated a call for urgent action on crew change ahead of the UN General Assembly or face ships no longer being able to operate safely worsening the economic crisis. Lim called on all governments to take action on the crew change crisis what was described as a “strong statement” by the IMO. “Nearly six months have passed since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic, and the numerous restrictions and obstacles that prevent crew changes have created a humanitarian crisis at sea,” he said.  FULL STORY

SHIPPING SUFFERS WAVE OF SPILLS, FIRES, COLLISIONS AND LIVES LOST
Source: International Shipping News
A fully laden crude tanker went up in flames. A giant dry bulk ship broke in two on a reef, spilling fuel into pristine waters. A livestock carrier sailed into a typhoon, killing over 40 crew and 5,800 cattle. A tanker and barge collided, with 14 presumed dead. Another tanker, used to store crude oil offshore, began to take on water. And all of that happened in the past six weeks. The frequency of shipping casualties has dramatically decreased over recent decades.  FULL STORY

TRAPPED BY PANDEMIC, SHIPS’ CREWS FIGHT EXHAUSTION AND DESPAIR
Source: Aurora Almendral (New York Times)
When borders closed, seafarers on ships around the world suddenly had no way home. Half a year later, there’s no solution in sight. BANGKOK — Ralph Santillan, a merchant seaman from the Philippines, hasn’t had shore leave in half a year. It has been 18 months since he reported for duty on his ship, which hauls corn, barley and other commodities around the world. It has been even longer since he saw his wife and son. “There’s nothing I can do,” Mr. Santillan said late last month from his ship, a 965-foot bulk carrier off South Korea. “I have to leave to God whatever might happen here.”  FULL STORY

MARITIME UNION OUTLINES URGENT CASE FOR REFORM AT SENATE INQUIRY INTO AUSTRALIAN SHIPPING
Source: Mirage News
A Senate inquiry into Australian shipping has heard that the nation needs to urgently reduce its dependence on foreign shipping, with the COVID-19 pandemic highlighting the need to strengthen the resilience of maritime supply chains and increase self-sufficiency. Maritime Union of Australia national secretary Paddy Crumlin outlined the case for major industry reform at a public hearing of the Senate Standing Committee on Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport inquiry into Australian shipping.  FULL STORY

BROWN MARMORATED STINK BUG – SEPTEMBER SEASON STARTS WITH 2020-21 MEASURES IN PLACE
Source: BIMCO
For the new season beginning September 2020, New Zealand and Australia have introduced the measures to combat increasing spread of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMST) coming from targeted “BMST” countries which have now risen to 37 countries with the inclusion of Kazakhstan, Moldova, Portugal and Ukraine. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) season has begun effective 1 September 2020. As usual, Australia and New Zealand authorities have set out their requirements for the current season 2020/21 to ensure that these bugs are kept out of their countries. BMSBs are a serious pest and pose a threat to the country’s agricultural industries and are frequently found in goods carried as sea-freight.  FULL STORY

CHINA'S TRADE DISPUTE WITH AUSTRALIA HAS NOT EXTENDED TO IRON ORE ... YET
Source: Andrew Robertson (ABC News)
Australia's relationship with its biggest trading partner, China, has deteriorated rapidly this year. As Australia has taken a firmer stance on issues such as China's South China Sea incursions and investigations into the source and handling of the COVID-19 outbreak, the nation's biggest trading partner has hit back through hip pocket diplomacy. Huge tariffs on Australian barley, bans on some Australian beef, restrictions on coal and an investigation into wine are just some of the shots being fired across Australia's bow.  FULL STORY

BHP SPELLS OUT 40% EMISSIONS REDUCTION GOAL FOR ITS SHIPPING
Source: Lucy Hine (TradeWinds)
Australian mining giant BHP is backing a 40% emissions reduction for its ship chartering operations. BHP said it has set Scope 3 goals — which are targets related to emissions that occur outside the company’s operated assets — for 2030 to support the 40% emissions-intensity reduction of shipping its products on chartered ships. The target was unveiled in the company's Climate Change Report 2020, which was published on Thursday. "We expect to achieve our Scope 3 goal through chartering choices,… said BHP.  FULL STORY

RICH BHP IRON ORE ROYALTIES JUST THE START FOR ILUKA SPIN-OFF
Source: Brad Thompson (Australian Financial Review)
The company set to become Australia’s newest iron ore money spinner will look to diversify its royalty-based income stream through acquisitions in base, battery and precious metals as well as energy. Mineral sands miner Iluka Resources is a step closer to splitting off its lucrative BHP iron ore royalty business to create Deterra Royalties after the release of the scheme booklet on Thursday. Deterra, led by former Iluka and Wesfarmers executive Julian Andrews, said it would pay out 100 per cent of its net profit in dividends, with the demerger backed by the Iluka board, big investors and an independent expert's report.  FULL STORY

AUGUST IRON ORE EXPORTS REBOUND, BUT STILL WELL OFF JUNE HIGHS
Source: Glenn Dyer (ShareCafe)
Iron ore exports to China recovered in August, but were still far short of the record 46.2 million tonnes shipped from Port Hedland in June, the Pilbara Ports Authority reported on Tuesday. Data for July showed exports fell more than 17% to 38.14 million tonnes from June’s record 46.18 million, leading some commentators and analysts to speculate that China was cutting imports of Australian iron ore to ‘punish’ the country in the same way that the duties on Australian barley imports and anti-dumping investigations against Australian wine.  FULL STORY

AL KUWAIT RETURNING TO FREMANTLE TO COLLECT SHEEP FOR EXPORT
Source: Jenne Brammer (The West Australian)
TheAl Kuwait live export carrier is steaming its way back to Fremantle to collect its first load of WA sheep in almost three months. The vessel, which had 20 of its 48 crew members test positive for COVID-19 after arriving in Fremantle in May, departed Dubai this week and is set arrive just as the northern hemisphere summer shipping ban ends on September 15. Ports Minister Alannah MacTiernan said in light of the ship’s history with the virus the last time it was in WA, the Fremantle Port Authority would work with WA Health to ensure the vessel’s reporting is reliable. FULL STORY

DISRUPTION FROM WATERFRONT INDUSTRIAL ACTION JUST GETS WORSE AND WORSE
Source: Shipping Australia
Industrial action on the waterfront is causing increasing disruption to the movement of ships and the movement of vital goods upon which Australian families rely. At least two ship voyages have been greatly delayed at huge cost.
A ship was due to call at Sydney earlier this week. It was faced with a five-day delay because of protected industrial action. The approximate cost of a day’s delay for a container ship can be about $25,000 a day. A five-day delay could therefore cost about $125,000.  FULL STORY

AUSTRALIA OPENS UNDERGROUND MINE EXPLOSIVES TESTING FACILITY
Source: Mining Technology
The Government of New South Wales, Australia (NSW), has announced the launch of an underground mine explosives facility on the Central Coast to encourage further innovation and development of explosive testing in the mining industry. The Government of New South Wales, Australia (NSW), has announced the launch of an underground mine explosives facility on the Central Coast to encourage further innovation and development of explosive testing in the mining industry.  FULL STORY

AUCKLAND PORT DEATHS: TRANSPORT MINISTER CALLS FOR 'HARD LOOK' AT COMPANY
Source: George Block (Stuff)
The Transport Minister says it’s time for a hard look at the Ports of Auckland after three deaths in as many years linked to lax health and safety. Phil Twyford also called into question the controversial 12-hour graveyard shifts operated by the company, during which the two latest fatalities happened. His comments come as pressure mounts on the company following the death of father-of-seven Pala’amo (Amo) Kalati, who was crushed to death by a container aboard a ship early on August 30.  FULL STORY

THOUSANDS OF AUCKLAND PORT WORKERS EXEMPT FROM COMPULSORY COVID-19 TESTS
Source: RNZ
Thousands of Ports of Auckland workers are exempt from compulsory Covid-19 border testing, because they are not considered high risk. Of the up to 6000 workers, 1000 will be tested every fortnight under the new border regime that began this week. Shipping pilots, those loading and unloading foreign vessels and people transporting crew all have to be tested every two weeks.  Ports of Auckland spokesperson Matt Ball says it would be impossible to test thousands of workers in that timeframe and it was a nightmare when health officials asked for it to be done in a first round of surveillance testing last month.  FULL STORY

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Inchcape Shipping Services accepts no liability nor makes any representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to its completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability